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Appareils & Photos

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M984.308.1.1-3
© McCord Museum
Camera
Polaroid Corporation
1977-1978, 20th century
14 x 21 x 17 cm
Gift of Stanley G. Triggs
M984.308.1.1-3
© McCord Museum

Comments:

Les boutton de lapareille photos sont completement different que les notre.


M967.103.3.1-2
© McCord Museum
Camera
About 1897, 19th century or 20th century
11.4 x 11.4 x 15.2 cm
Gift of Mrs. Violet Lefèbvre
M967.103.3.1-2
© McCord Museum

Comments:

Les appareil photos resemble a nos haut parleur.

Keys to History:

Until the very late 1880s, photography was essentially the preserve of professionals and the enlightened amateurs and curious few who were not put off by the harmful chemical fumes or the long hours spent in the darkroom. The introduction of Kodak cameras revolutionized photography. Anyone could take pictures without knowing much about technique: "You Press the Button, We Do the Rest," was Kodak's famous promise. This marked the advent of amateur photography.

What:

The term "Kodak," coined in 1888, is an onomatopoeia describing the clicking sound of the shutter of the new camera manufactured by the Eastman Dry Plate Company founded in 1881. The simplicity of the camera marketed by the Eastman Kodak Company was a key factor in its popularity with amateurs. This camera came with photographic film, a new invention used for the first time in the Kodak no. 1.

Where:

The Eastman Kodak Company was founded in 1892 in Rochester, NY. The Canadian Kodak Company was founded in Toronto in 1899. In Montreal, it was not before 1902 that Kodak supplies and equipment could be purchased at the Montreal Photographic Supply Co., a store located at the corner of Peel and Notre Dame Streets.

When:

Available from 1895 to 1913, this popular camera sold for about eight dollars (U.S.) when it first went on the market. This was equivalent to the average weekly wage of a Canadian worker in 1901.

Who:

George Eastman (1854-1932) built a successful company on the following four principles: mass production at low cost, international distribution, extensive advertising and listening to consumers. The Kodak Company used persuasive sales strategies, for example, encouraging photographers to create an "illustrated history" of their lives. From 1904 to 1911, it even organized contests and travelling exhibits and gave prizes for the best photos taken with its supplies and equipment.

M992X.4.1
© McCord Museum
View camera
Scovill Manufacturing Co.
About 1870, 19th century
M992X.4.1
© McCord Museum

Comments:

Sa ressemble a un accordehon.


M2009.17.2.1-5
© McCord Museum
Camera
Folmer Graflex Corp.
About 1920, 20th century
Mahogany, metal, glass, rubber
51.5 x 45.3 x 62.5 cm
Gift of Mr. George A. Dudkoff
M2009.17.2.1-5
© McCord Museum

Comments:

Coup de coeur: Pusique jaime beaucoup la couleur du bois.


M986.293.2.1-2
© McCord Museum
Folding camera
Eastman Kodak Co.
About 1916, 20th century
21.7 x 11 x 4.6 cm
Gift of Mr. Henry B. Yates
M986.293.2.1-2
© McCord Museum

Comments:

Il y a beaucoup de petit details.


I-16720.1
© McCord Museum
Photograph
Hon. J. Howe, Montreal, QC, 1865
William Notman (1826-1891)
1865, 19th century
Silver salts on paper mounted on paper - Albumen process
8.5 x 5.6 cm
Purchase from Associated Screen News Ltd.
I-16720.1
© McCord Museum

Comments:

ceci est Joseph Howe, fonctionnaire, premier ministre de la Nouvelle-Écosse.

Keys to History:

In the course of his career, Joseph Howe was a journalist, public servant, Nova Scotia Premier, federal cabinet minister and Lieutenant-Governor of his native province. He was also one of the moving forces behind the construction of a railway in Nova Scotia.

In 1864, Howe was the former Premier of Nova Scotia and an opponent of the Quebec Resolutions that were to become the foundation of the Confederation proposal. Since his position at the time did not allow him to express his concerns publicly, Howe published a series of anonymous articles in Halifax's Morning Chronicle in 1865. Titled the Botheration Letters, these articles drew a link between Confederation and a range of problems. Howe maintained that the Quebec Resolutions would strip Nova Scotia of its independence and devastate its economy, most notably through increased tariffs and import taxes that would raise costs on manufactured goods. Moreover, he could not envision the various populations of the federation uniting into a single "nation." But above all, Howe believed that Nova Scotians had the right to decide for themselves whether or not to join the federal union.

Premier Charles Tupper made no attempt to consult the population before convincing the Nova Scotia Legislature to adopt the Quebec Resolutions in 1866. In response, Howe re-entered the Nova Scotia political arena and, for the next two years, opposed the union project by delivering numerous speeches and leading a delegation to England. Despite his efforts, the British North America Act was adopted in 1867. The following year, Howe returned to England with a Nova Scotia delegation determined to win repeal of the Act that had brought Confederation into being. That effort failed.

What:

This photograph was taken in the Montreal studios of celebrated photographer William Notman. Several photos of well-known people, such as Joseph Howe, were sold to the general public.

Where:

Following the Quebec Conference in 1864, most of Nova Scotia's ruling class were opposed to the seventy-two proposed resolutions.

When:

Some people believe that Joseph Howe's Botheration Letters (1865), published anonymously in the Morning Chronicle, were a major influence on public opinion in Nova Scotia.

Who:

Joseph Howe served as Nova Scotia Premier from 1860 to 1862, and leader of Nova Scotia's anti-Confederation movement until 1868.


II-146722
© McCord Museum
Photograph
Houses for Mr. Meredith, corner of Barré and Aqueduct Streets, Montreal, QC, 1903
Wm. Notman & Son
1903, 20th century
Silver salts on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
20 x 25 cm
Purchase from Associated Screen News Ltd.
II-146722
© McCord Museum

Comments:

Coup de coeur: Maisons photographiées pour M. Meredith. ses drole de voir a quel poin tout à changer, la maison comme la rue...

Keys to History:

As the hanging wall sign indicates, this house is located on Barré Street. The street itself was part of Griffintown, a working-class section of Montreal's Sainte-Anne district, bound by Notre-Dame, McGill and Guy Streets.

In working-class neighbourhoods, a typical house was often made of wood. After 1850, however, the new homes of workers were increasingly built of brick. A number of fires had broken out in Montreal, forcing the authorities to adopt measures that would eventually lead to the demise of wood houses. In the 18th century, following a fire that took place in 1721, a municipal ordinance was introduced banning the construction of wood houses in the city centre, or Old Montreal as it is known today. After another fire in 1852, the ban was extended to include the surrounding neighbourhoods.

Before being annexed to the city in the early 1900s, the villages surrounding Montreal continued to construct wood houses. And even in the city, as shown in this photograph, it was still possible to catch sight of a wood house.

What:

In working-class neighbourhoods at the start of the 20th century, the single-family home, as seen here, was being replaced more and more by a newer style of dwelling - the duplex and the triplex.

Where:

In the early 1900s, Barré Street was located in Griffintown, a Sainte-Anne district neighbourhood which has since disappeared (south-western part of Montreal). Griffintown's population was made up of many workers of Irish origin.

When:

By 1903, Montreal was a densely populated city. Between 1890 and 1920, the number of newcomers, many drawn by work opportunities in local industries, nearly tripled the city's population. In 1921, the total number of residents had climbed to almost 620,000.

Who:

Mr. Meredith probably never lived in this house. In all likelihood, these photos were taken for Vincent H. Meredith, the manager of the Bank of Montreal.

N-0000.73.19
© McCord Museum
Photograph
Grand Trunk Railway Engineering Department group, composite 1877
Notman & Sandham
1877, 19th century
Silver salts on paper mounted on card - Albumen process
27 x 35 cm
Purchase from Associated Screen News Ltd.
N-0000.73.19
© McCord Museum

Comments:

Groupe du service d'ingénierie du chemin de fer du Grand Tronc, Jaime vraiment cette photos, mais je ne suis pas sure si ses un tableau ou une photos...

Keys to History:

This group from the Grand Trunk's Engineering Department is posing near a bridge on which a locomotive has stopped. Canadian history is punctuated with several railway accidents; some were caused by infrastructure or rolling stock in poor repair or by technical failures. The bridge over the Desjardins Canal in Hamilton, that collapsed under a train in 1857, was a striking example. However, the railway companies increasingly took safety measures to ensure their trains would be totally secure.

Several technological innovations in the 19th century would play a very important role in this area. Westinghouse pneumatic brakes would soon replace manual brakes aboard trains. Then the telegraph and later the radio and telephone would facilitate communications. The work of experienced employees, who inspected the infrastructures and checked the alignment of the rails, also played an important role in ensuring the security of trains.

What:

Canadian engineers faced important challenges when building railways, particularly the long distances to be crossed and the varied and often uneven relief that had to be taken into account.

Where:

In the 1860s, the Grand Trunk linked the port of Portland, United States, open year round, to the city of Sarnia in Ontario. In the 1880s, the company would expand towards Western Canada.

When:

The Grand Trunk was created in 1852 to connect Toronto and Montreal. In 1867, the Grand Trunk was made up of 2 055 kilometres of railroad, which made it the largest railway in the world.

Who:

Painter and illustrator Henry Sandham was the associate of renowned photographer William Notman from 1877 to 1882. He notably perfected the composite photography technique, which consisted of a montage of individual photos on a painted background.

II-20021.1
© McCord Museum
Photograph
Camping Composite, 1875
William Notman (1826-1891)
1875, 19th century
Silver salts on paper mounted on paper - Albumen process
10 x 14 cm
Purchase from Associated Screen News Ltd.
II-20021.1
© McCord Museum

Comments:

composite sur le thème du camping, 1875 par William Notman. Ses que jaime dans cette photos ses que ont voie le maude de vie de certait personne...

Description:

Encouraged by the public reception and the brisk sales of variously sized copies of the "Skating Carnival" composite produced in 1870, Notman began to include composites as part of his regular service to customers. In the next five years alone, his Montreal studio produced several dozen composites with subjects as widely diverse as the military, families, schools, actors, clergymen and sports groups including snowshoeing, rowing, camping, skating, lacrosse, football and cricket.


© Musée McCord Museum