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Darius' school assignment

Darius

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Introduction:

in this folder i will have images and why i had chosen these pictures or whats happening in these pictures, I hope you enjoy.


Guelph02
This artefact belongs to : © Guelph Museums
Photograph
John McCrae's medals
1999, 20th century
15 x 10.4 cm
Guelph02
This artefact belongs to : © Guelph Museums

Comments:

in this image it shows the medals john McCrae had received. the roll john had played was a lieutenant colonel in WW1 and a surgeon in the second WW.He sadly passed away in the second WW because of Pneumonia.

Keys to History:

These highly esteemed medals would be less significant had they not been awarded to the war poet who was also one of Canada's most noted medical heroes. An examination of each medal and the events that led to its being awarded allows us to learn more about John McCrae life and Canada's role in world history in the early 20th century.

What:

John McCrae's military medals consist of two (on the left) issued for service in the Boer War; the others and the large medallion on the right are for service in the First World War.

Where:

John McCrae received the Boer War medal at a ceremony outside the main railway station in Montreal. The First World War medals were issued for service in France and Belgium.

When:

John McCrae received his Boer War medal on September 18, 1901. His First World War medals, awarded posthumously, were sent to his family at various times between 1920 and 1923.

Who:

After disappearing from view, John McCrae's medals resurfaced at a Toronto auction house and were purchased by Canadian businessman Arthur Lee, who in turn donated them to McCrae House.

ANC-C6846
This artefact belongs to : © National Archives of Canada
Photograph
Imperial War Cabinet
May 1, 1917, 20th century
ANC-C6846
This artefact belongs to : © National Archives of Canada

Comments:

this picture is a picture of some of the commanders and lieutenants of princess patricia's canadian light infantry. the photo was taken in their cabin.

Keys to History:

A year after Borden's New Year's announcement there had been terrible losses in France and a change of government in Britain, largely engineered by two Canadians, Max Aitken and Arthur Bonar Law. In March 1917 Canada's prime minister joined Dominion colleagues and British ministers in an Imperial War Cabinet. "If we want their men", the new prime minister David Lloyd George told his new adviser Colonel Maurice Hankey, "we must call them to our councils." And he did.

It took a further year of terrible losses at Arras and in the Passchendaele offensive before the British leaders told the Dominion premiers the full truth about the war and listened to their advice. In fact, the experiment was unworkable. Dominion advice led chiefly to involvement in Russia's civil war, while Dominion premiers like Borden could not act as prime ministers when they were far away in London. Nor, when they reckoned up the full cost of the war, would Canadians willingly bear the apparent burdens of a world-wide Empire. Experience backed full sovereignty for Canada and other Dominions, not the imperial federation that had been Borden's dream in 1914.

What:

Never before had leaders from the self-governing colonies been present at a meeting of the British cabinet -- but never before had their support been as vital.

Where:

The photo was taken in the garden behind No. 10 Downing Street in London, the official residence of the British prime minister.

When:

The photograph was taken in March or April, 1917.

Who:

The British prime minister, David Lloyd George, sits between two Canadians at the Imperial War cabinet in 1917. Arthur Bonar-Law, a New Brunswicker who headed the British Conservative party, is on his right, and Sir Robert Borden, the Nova Scotian who headed Canada's government, is on his left. They are surrounded by other British and Dominion leaders and the prime minister's staff.

ANC-C68841
This artefact belongs to : © National Archives of Canada
Photograph
"Off to War", Alberta
1914-1918, 20th century
ANC-C68841
This artefact belongs to : © National Archives of Canada

Comments:

these soldiers had just recently passed basic training to join the war and are now off to war.i chose this image because it reminds me of when my cousin went off to fight in afghanistan as a peace keeper.

Keys to History:

A million Canadian men volunteered for the C.E.F. during the First World War, and half were accepted. Why did so many volunteer? Few could ever identify a single reason. In 1914 one Canadian worker in six was unemployed: some volunteers needed a job. Others craved excitement or escape. Many felt a sense of duty. Joining seemed the proper thing to do after what young men had learned in school, at church and from newspapers. Though most of them volunteered after the First Contingent had lost over 6,000 dead and wounded at Ypres in April 1915, they believed that, somehow, they would come home knowing that they had done their duty for King and Country. If they did not volunteer, they might always feel ashamed of themselves. Others might consider them cowards.

What:

Recruiting standards required a man aged 18 to 45, physically fit, and at least 5 feet, 3 inches tall, with a chest measurement of 331/2 inches. Volunteers who were rejected had usually failed the physical, a sad commentary on the fitness of Canadian men. During the first year of the war a married recruit needed his wife's permission to enlist: some men were sent home when they could not get their spouse's approval. Although fitness standards were low, many unfit recruits were accepted. During the first three years of the war more disability pensions were paid to men who should not have been enlisted than were given to soldiers wounded at the Front.

Where:

Canada's Militia Department left recruiting to militia regiments or to prominent men who hoped to become colonels by recruiting their own battalions. The fact that a volunteer would serve with pals from his home town or county constituted a powerful recruiting tool.

When:

C.E.F. battalions recruited in 1915 and 1916 spent the best part of a year in Canada training and adding volunteers. In winter, because Canada had few barracks, they were often allowed to live at home, but in summer they lived in tented camps.

Who:

Though half the potential recruits enlisted, another half did not. They too had reasons, from deep family commitments to a distaste for the brand of patriotism that attracted many other Canadians. For many French Canadians and for immigrants from central and eastern Europe, it was simply not their war. In French-speaking Quebec anti-war feelings were so strong that relatively few chose to volunteer. Men from countries at war with the British Empire were soon forbidden to enlist.

MP-0000.2082.6
© McCord Museum
Photograph
Women at tables, International Manufacturing Co., Montreal, QC, 1914-8
Black & Bennett
1914-1918, 20th century
Silver salts on paper mounted on linen - Gelatin silver process
17 x 24 cm
From Anglin-Norcross Limited
MP-0000.2082.6
© McCord Museum

Comments:

women also helped at home to win the war by knitting socks or packing ammo or making ration packs. most of the women volunteered because their husband or sons could be fighting so they wanted to help. this was mostly paid work bus some women had volunteered.

Keys to History:

By the end of 1918 over half a million Canadians, mostly men, were in military uniform, a staggering achievement for a nation of 8.1 million. Every soldier, however, represented one less factory worker. By 1915 the war economy's demand for labour obliged employers to recruit women into jobs traditionally occupied by men. Women quickly displaced men in clerical positions in offices and banks, and took over in other service jobs such as streetcar conductors. They were then brought into manufacturing jobs. By 1917 over 35,000 women were working in central Canadian munitions plants.

Munitions work paid well above the national average in manufacturing, but women earned only 50-83% of what men in the same jobs received. Hours were long - 13-14 hour days. Women were seen as the nation's reserve army of labour, destined to return home when the war ended.

What:

Women were generally employed in "busy hands" jobs that involved speed and dexterity, such as putting fuses into shells or putting primer caps into cartridges.

Where:

While women in the western provinces took on farm jobs, most paid female employment in the war was in central Canada. Most workers were young single women. In Ontario, the Young Women's Christian Association arranged chaperoning of working "girls," opening canteens and hostels for them.

When:

Women's appearance in non-traditional wartime occupations coincided with first-wave feminism, the movement of women out of the domestic realm into the workaday world. If women could make munitions, they should also be able to vote. Ontario became the fifth province to accord this right in 1917.

Who:

Many Canadian women participated in an informal wartime economy through such organizations as the Red Cross and the War Council of Women, by knitting clothing and preparing bandages and food parcels for the "boys at the front." A few women donned uniforms as nurses and ambulance drivers.

II-222454.0.2
© McCord Museum
Photograph
Canadian officers inspecting captured guns, near Vimy Ridge, France, 1917
Anonyme - Anonymous
1917, 20th century
Silver salts on paper - Gelatin silver process
20 x 25 cm
Purchase from Associated Screen News Ltd.
II-222454.0.2
© McCord Museum

Comments:

once the canadians had taken over vimy ridge the had found german weapons so the were sent off of the ridge to be searched or checked so they can better their weapons.

Keys to History:

The war played a decisive role in the prohibitionist victory. Taking advantage of the sensitive socio-political climate, the prohibitionists adroitly claimed that it was anti-patriotic to oppose a measure that would save grain and put an end to waste. How could people go on drinking, they cried, when Canadian soldiers were risking their lives in mud-swamped trenches infested with rats and lice? Pressured by public opinion, which had rallied to the cause, the governments finally acted. Municipal authorities prohibited the retail sale of alcohol. In 1918 the federal government filled in the blanks with a series of orders in council banning the production, interprovincial sales and import of alcohol. Waste was avoided, claimed the prohibitionists, but poverty and want - the causes of which were more complex than then believed - were not eradicated. After the war, when patriotism waned abruptly, both provincial and federal governments abandoned prohibition.

What:

The Canadian Expeditionary Force, the name given to the Canadian divisions sent to the front in France, has just won a stunning victory over the German Imperial Army. Canadian officers are inspecting weapons seized from the enemy.

Where:

The battle took place along a six-kilometre stretch of front along Vimy ridge. Some months earlier the British and French armies had tried to penetrate this part of the front without success.

When:

The engagement lasted from the 9 to the 14 April 1917 and cost the Canadians 10,602 wounded and 3,598 dead. It was a huge human sacrifice, which the prohibitionists did not hesitate to exploit in order to combat the scourge of alcohol.

Who:

Equipping and maintaining the striking force of the four divisions that composed the Expeditionary Corps required a considerable effort on Canada's part. Prime Minister Borden would have to use conscription in 1917 to keep the force up to strength. .

Conclusion:

in conclusion these are some of the images that i had found interesting and i hope you enjoy them.


© Musée McCord Museum