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The Story of a Soldier

Matthew Nesbitt And Evan Trippel

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Introduction:

For our story board we chose to do a journal of a fictional man by the name of John Berton. He lived during the nineteen tens, the age of the First World War. He was a young man who lived with his family in Halifax, with a life full of hopes and dreams. But when his country was in such dire need, he put those dreams aside. We hope this will show to some extent, the horrors that countless brave men faced and lived through, and even more who didn't.


II-228014.0
© McCord Museum
Photograph
First World War group, copied for J. D. Patterson in 1918
Anonyme - Anonymous
1918, 20th century
Silver salts on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
12 x 17 cm
Purchase from Associated Screen News Ltd.
II-228014.0
© McCord Museum

Comments:

August 14, 1914

My name is John Berton, I'm a 24 year old man, and today I volunteered in the Royal Canadian Military to help in the war against Germany. Because of this I've decided to keep a journal of my leave of duty for the next three or four months. I went to the recruiting post and they checked me over to see that I was fit and healthy. I got my picture taken with the regiment I was assigned to, and then they marched us off to boot camp. I'll probably be back home by Christmas.


04558
Training
Unknown
04558

Comments:

August 15, 1914

Today our regiment began basic training. We started our day about an hour before sunrise, most men were already awake though, and none of us could sleep since we were all too nervous about the two months of preparation that lay ahead of us. Luckily though, a friend of mine from Halifax is here with me. Thomas and I grew up together, and nothing against the other men I'm serving with, who are all fine men, but there's no one else I would rather have watching my back. We started with some simple running drills, simple, not easy. After an hour of running, they decided it was time for some cleaning.

About five of us were assigned to the barracks we wee staying in, and were told not to leave a spec of dirt. To make matters worse, all we were given to do this was a bucket of water and a toothbrush. After we had cleaned the entire barracks (must have taken two or three hours) the Sergeant then got us on the obstacle course.

Every one here can't wait to finish boot camp and go kick some crout butt, but for now we've got another two months of this training, and it can't end soon enough.


VIEW-6414
© McCord Museum
Photograph
Troops arriving on S. S. Orduna, Halifax, NS, 1918
Wm. Notman & Son
1918, 20th century
Silver salts on film (nitrate) - Gelatin silver process
20 x 25 cm
Purchase from Associated Screen News Ltd.
VIEW-6414
© McCord Museum

Comments:

October 29, 1915

Today we finally arrived in France, and the very sight of this place chills my blood. Every building around us is hollow from artillery shells, the streets are blocked with rubble. It took us a good hour just to get through one small town, because there was only one mane road, and it was completely impassible. Of course the rubble and signs of destruction are manageable, its the bodies. Every were I look, the ground is littered with them. Not just soldiers, but women, and even, children.... With these pictures in mind, everyone in the regiment now has some fuel to keep them going, some payment they must deliver.


MP-0000.72.1
© McCord Museum
Photograph
Victoria Rifles guarding railroad bridge, Montreal, QC, 1939
Anonyme - Anonymous
1939, 20th century
Silver salts on paper mounted on card - Gelatin silver process
11 x 17 cm
MP-0000.72.1
© McCord Museum

Comments:

November 15, 1914
The first place we were assigned to was a cruddy little bridge near Paris. None of us like it, we wanted the action we had heard of repeatedly from the front lines. Guarding this bridge is not for our regiment, the French armies could do it themselves.


VIEW-19487
© McCord Museum
Photograph
Soldiers marching past shelled buildings, World War I, painting, copied 1920
Wm. Notman & Son
1920, 20th century
Silver salts, paint (masking) on film (nitrate ?) - Gelatin silver process
19 x 24 cm
Purchase from Associated Screen News Ltd.
VIEW-19487
© McCord Museum

Comments:

January 2, 1915
We were finally told to march to the front to take up our posts. We never expected what hit us. As soon as we got to a kilometer of the trenches it was a sea of mud. Mud everywhere. Around us were shelled buildings, wounded men being brought to the already overcrowded hospital. When I took a look at the place we were assigned to, I almost wept with despair. If we are going to be living in the filth of those trenches, fending off attacks and then attacking back, the war would go on forever. The war was going to be a very long one, and it was past Christmas too. At that moment, I knew none of us would go home in one piece.


II-230538.0
© McCord Museum
Photograph
World War I soldiers and trench, about 1915, copied for Rev. Dr. Symond in 1919
Anonyme - Anonymous
1919, 20th century
Silver salts on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
20 x 25 cm
Purchase from Associated Screen News Ltd.
II-230538.0
© McCord Museum

Comments:

March 8, 1915
Our position was near the German lines, only about 400 meters away were their machines guns that you could hear chattering away at night. Now we look back and remember the simple days of patrolling the bridge and envy those who now assigned to that same bridge. Every now and then a shell whistled overhead to come crashing into our trench. There was always another trench to dig. "The regiment's feet are the most important part of the regiment," we kept being told continuously time after time. Whenever we had spare time we changed our socks. Tomorrow they are sending us over into No Man's Land to take the enemy's trench. I pray to God I will be spared of death


II-215217.0
© McCord Museum
Photograph
Two men with Red Cross vehicle, copied for Mrs. G. A. Grier in 1916
Anonyme - Anonymous
1916, 20th century
Silver salts on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
12 x 17 cm
Purchase from Associated Screen News Ltd.
II-215217.0
© McCord Museum

Comments:

March 9, 1915
When I went over the trench I immediately felt like being kicked down in my leg, like the biggest charlie horse I could imagine slammed down on my left leg. I lay there, motionless, for a few seconds, then I blacked out.
I woke up later to a lurch. At first I think I'm dead, that I'm in heaven, but then I realize the movement of a truck and remember running up the trench. This must be an ambulance, I thought, and i sat up and looked around to see other wounded men, some I saw had no hope of living, but clung on to life to their very last breath. I saw some in my regiment in there with me, and I wasn't sure if it gave me comfort to see them here with me or concerned for the safety of my regiment. The car stopped, and we got carried out to beds on stretchers


II-243223.0
© McCord Museum
Photograph
Officer and nurses, World War I, about 1915, copied for Dr. Maud Abbott in 1921
Anonyme - Anonymous
1921, 20th century
Silver salts on glass - Gelatin silver process
12 x 20 cm
Purchase from Associated Screen News Ltd.
II-243223.0
© McCord Museum

Comments:

March 9, 1915
When I went over the trench I immediately felt like being kicked down in my leg, like the biggest charlie horse I could imagine slammed down on my left leg. I lay there, motionless, for a few seconds, and then I blacked out.
I woke up later to a lurch. At first I think I'm dead, that I'm in heaven, but then I realize the movement of a truck and remember running up the trench. This must be an ambulance, I thought, and i sat up and looked around to see other wounded men, some I saw had no hope of living, but clung on to life to their very last breath. I saw some in my regiment in there with me, and I wasn't sure if it gave me comfort to see them here with me or concerned for the safety of my regiment. The car stopped, and we got carried out to beds on stretchers


VIEW-19490
© McCord Museum
Photograph
Airplane bombing, World War I, painting, copied 1920
Wm. Notman & Son
1920, 20th century
Silver salts on film (nitrate ?) - Gelatin silver process
20 x 25 cm
Purchase from Associated Screen News Ltd.
VIEW-19490
© McCord Museum

Comments:

April 29, 1915

Today I witnessed the most destructive thing I have ever seen. Our regiment, whom there is barely any of the original recruits left, was nearly completely destroyed in the same attack I was shot in. We now share the left side of a system of trenches with another regiment. But today I saw something beyond belief. It was noon when an axis plane flew over our trench and bombed the regiment we shared the trench with. Since they were so cramped, their regiment was almost completely wiped out. We were left unscathed, but it made us all realize how easily that could have been us. We now cherish every day as if it were our last.


VIEW-15403
© McCord Museum
Photograph
War scene, painting by Louis Keene, copied for Art Association 1915
Wm. Notman & Son
1915, 20th century
Silver salts on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
20 x 25 cm
Purchase from Associated Screen News Ltd.
VIEW-15403
© McCord Museum

Comments:

April 15, 1915

Yesterday was the worst day of the entire war yet. Nine men, Thomas and I included, were sent out today on a scouting mission to locate the German pill boxes our regiment was assigned to take out. The plan was to go along an abandoned trench to come up on a hill with an overlook of the entire valley. We had hoped not to be spotted by the Germans by staying low, but the trench was far shallower then we had thought, and a Crout sentry spotted us. We all knew that once the pill box zeroed in on us we were dead, so we had to retreat. A couple of the men decided to run for it, but were picked of as soon as they left the trench. The Captain told us we needed someone to lay down covering fire while we moved back, Thomas volunteered. We all made it to a safe distance easily enough, and were about to return fire for Thomas when he suddenly stopped firing. He just stood there for a moment, until his legs suddenly buckled, and he fell backwards into the trench. I knew he was already dead, but I still tried to reach him. A couple of the guys held me back for what seemed like hours, until my legs failed me, and just sank to my knees...


MP-0000.2221.1
© McCord Museum
Photograph
Officers and men with cannon, Valcartier, QC, 1914-18
James Dennison
1914-1918, 20th century
Silver salts on paper mounted on card - Gelatin silver process
17 x 12 cm
MP-0000.2221.1
© McCord Museum

Comments:

June 15, 1915
The new campaign has been launched and today we were sent over the trenches to capture the opposing trench. I was surprised with the relative ease it took, maybe we've gotten better at killing, and maybe they've gotten worse. Whatever it was, we captured 3 guns and took over 30 feet worth of trenches. We did a damn good job.


MP-1982.64.74
© McCord Museum
Photograph
Canon F. G. Scott "with some of our boys", Salisbury Plain, England, 1915
A. R. Bott
1915, 20th century
Silver salts on paper - Gelatin silver process
12 x 17 cm
Gift of F. R. Scott
MP-1982.64.74
© McCord Museum

Comments:

June 24, 1915
They moved us back to the reserves to let the second line take our places at the front, must be the amazing job we did clearing out that German trench that gave us the leave. The regiment gets to sleep in an actual building, the fist one I've seen here other than the hospital that hasn't been shelled. These are the days, where the only action you see is the occasional shell whistling overhead to land 100 meters away. Now that we've been to the front, we feel like real veterans, like we've really accomplished something for our country. The only things we have to worry about is not to make our officers angry. Everyone, even the officers, seem to be relieved we are here and safe from the dirty Germans.


MP-0000.2282
© McCord Museum
Photograph
Victoria Rifles officer in front of tent, about 1915
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1915, 20th century
Silver salts on paper - Gelatin silver process
15 x 20 cm
MP-0000.2282
© McCord Museum

Comments:

September 11, 1915
I just got promoted to lieutenant. The colonel of the regiment recognized me as a strong, independent man who would lead men into battle. At least, that's what he said to me. I can finally order people around to do things the way I want them. I get to lead the men into battle instead of following someone. The first thing that was recommended to me was to store the epaulettes in a safe spot and never where them except on ceremonies due to the dangerous chance I might be recognized as an officer by enemy snipers. I get to sleep in the officers tent, go into the nearby town (which is partly shelled, but a town is a town) and go to taverns and such things that would not be available to the ranks. I also get cheap wine at dinners when I eat at the officer's mess, a extra little perk.


II-223341.0
© McCord Museum
Photograph
Military pilot in airplane for G.B. Foster, copied 1918
Anonyme - Anonymous
1918, 20th century
Silver salts on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
25 x 20 cm
Purchase from Associated Screen News Ltd.
II-223341.0
© McCord Museum

Comments:

December 14, 1915
The army just received new planes to fight the enemy bombers. One man that I met in there, calling him self Jacob, is an airplane fighter. I asked him what the other side of the German trench looked like and he replied rolling green fields. I didn't believe it. It gives me great joy to see our boys up there stopping the German bombers from continuing their rampage of the skies. Now we have less to worry about and the New Year is on its way. Perhaps the war will be over next year.


VIEW-17450.0
© McCord Museum
Photograph
Two soldiers, copied for Mrs. Foster, 1918
Anonyme - Anonymous
1918, 20th century
Silver salts on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
17 x 12 cm
Purchase from Associated Screen News Ltd.
VIEW-17450.0
© McCord Museum

Comments:

April 9, 1916
I saw the first picture I've seen in two years. It surprised me and overwhelmed me, seeing something that was a little bit like home. The picture was an ad for the young men back at home. The picture made me think of home, of what my family was doing without me. Then I thought, life goes on, they'd be doing everything they would do if I were there. Everyone would be getting ready for Easter, and there would be much joy in the house. I want to go home more than anything else.

Keys to History:

The First World War was the first war ever photographed. Photographers' units attached to the armies were deployed on the different fronts to take pictures of battles. Propaganda was organized as dead and wounded are shown in the papers to appalled readers. Most photos, however, were taken by soldiers who had packed cameras along with their heavy gear. Amateur photographers took snaps of their comrades, life in the trenches, the disasters of war. Some of these portraits preserve forever the image of the dead.

What:

Photos of actual battles are quite rare. Most pictures that have survived represent the disastrous results of war--ruins, dead and wounded soldiers and civilians--or simply the everyday life of enlisted men.

Where:

It is not known where these two soldiers were when the photo was taken but the sign, and the changes that have been made to the warning, seem to indicate a training site.

When:

A considerable number of pictures were taken in the First World War. Photographs were published in the illustrated press with the proclaimed purpose of discouraging the enemy or boosting the nation's morale.

Who:

Many wartime photos were meant for family and friends. A photo provided reassurance that a soldier was still alive.

VIEW-19491
© McCord Museum
Photograph
Tank, World War I, painting, copied 1920
Wm. Notman & Son
1920, 20th century
Silver salts on film (nitrate ?) - Gelatin silver process
20 x 25 cm
Purchase from Associated Screen News Ltd.
VIEW-19491
© McCord Museum

Comments:

February 19, 1916

Today, for the first time in this entire war I saw a "Caterpillar". Everyone had heard of these monstrosities, massive lumbering machines of metal, rolling on 10 meter long treads, covered in metal from tip to tip. Our regiment was placed beside a British unit in the trenches, and the Brits called the thing in when the Germans tried to move forward.

We could all hear it long before we could see it, I think even the Germans could hear it before it was in sight. Then we all noticed the puddles in the trenches began to ripple, and our stomachs began to churn, and a few men even fell from there feet. Then, almost from thin air it rolled over the trench only a couple meters away from me. As we watched the tank roll into the middle of the field, the screech of a stray artillery shell filled the air. An explosion erupted where the tank had stood, and a cloud of dust hung over the impact site. I leaned over to one of the Brits and told him that it was over awfully quick, but he told me to watch. As the dust settled, we all watched in amazement as the tank continued on, almost unscathed, though a bit sluggish. With these on our side, I don't see how the war has lasted this long.


MP-1982.64.46
© McCord Museum
Photograph
F. G. Scott and officers of the "C" Company, 8th Battalion, Wanquetin, France, 1918
Anonyme - Anonymous
1918, 20th century
Silver salts on paper - Gelatin silver process
17 x 12 cm
Gift of F. R. Scott
MP-1982.64.46
© McCord Museum

Comments:

August 4, 1916
It has been three years to the day that I signed up for this war. I am practically the only man surviving from the original regiment, and it makes me feel lonely. I wonder to myself, I could have died in all those attacks, not my comrades, it could have just as easily been me all those times we went over into the shrieking noise of No Man's Land, with the whistle of machine gun bullets overhead and all around me. Today they took a picture of me and all the original men form the regiment that signed up for the people back home. I tell myself, they can see me, but I cannot see them, however much I want to, all the people back home, wondering how I've been. I wish I could see them one last time before I die out here.


MP-1982.64.42
© McCord Museum
Photograph
Canon F. G. Scott preaching a sermon, Bully Grenay, France(?), 1917
Arnold Birks
1917, 20th century
Silver salts on paper - Gelatin silver process
17 x 12 cm
Gift of F. R. Scott
MP-1982.64.42
© McCord Museum

Comments:

October 3rd, 1916

Today the village we were assigned to protect was zeroed in on by German batteries, normally this would be an everyday occurrence, but wouldn't you know it, we had a Sermon today.

The local priest had offered to hold a bilingual Sermon, since he knew a little English, and we a little French. For the most part we could understand him, we all had prayers, sang hymns, and just about everything you normally would do in church. This continued for about half an hour, before the all familiar scream of artillery surrounded us. We all had experience in this sort of thing and knew to take cover, except for the priest. After only a few seconds of confusion, a shell hit the steeple of the church, and it then collapsed onto the ceiling of the church. After we had regrouped at the front door I saw the priest lying under a pile of rubble at the organ. I ran to try and help him, only to see a pool of blood slowly form around him. In his hand he clenched a bible next to his chest. We regrouped in an old brick building, and the captain then decided to continue the sermon. It wasn't much, but we thought the priest would want it finished.


II-222454.0
© McCord Museum
Photograph
Canadian officers inspecting captured guns, near Vimy Ridge, France, 1917
Anonyme - Anonymous
1917, 20th century
Silver salts on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
20 x 25 cm
Purchase from Associated Screen News Ltd.
II-222454.0
© McCord Museum

Comments:

April 6-9, 1917
The reason why I am writing this over a couple of days is because the next few days are going to be very complicated and busy. You see, they are sending the entire line over, four battalions. Mine is one of these. We have been training for this for a few months, so much that every man has been assigned a specific job. Before we go over, however, they sent a week long barrage of artillery on the Germans to clear the way for us. I feel sorry for the Germans; I cannot imagine how any of them survived it if any did. I will find out when I go over the trench.
When i went over the trench, I had a sense that I was going to make it through the war. Then the machine gun bullets came towards us, and I realized that the barrage had done nothing, that we would all die in this crazy suicidal attack. We fought our way through the trenches, all of us, and took over the ridge. It was the greatest moment of my life. When I reached the top I looked back at what we had conquered, and I saw mud. Tons and tons of mud lying in fields as far as the eye could see. I looked forward, towards where the Germans had come from, and what I saw was beautiful. Rolling, green fields stretching on to the horizon, I now know we cannot lose, that good will triumph.


05080
photograph
Mustard Gas
05080

Comments:

August 15, 1917
Today I was burnt by a chemical. It hurts badly all over my body. One minute we were holding our own, and the next a cloud of gas engulfed us. Many have the same burnings as I do. I am in the hospital, but this time it is not a pleasant stay. All day I've been scratching my body, so much that I have rashes. Lumps are beginning to form on my skin. My comrades from the original regiment are in here too, it seems like no one has escaped this gas. I think it is my time to die. For years I've watched the worst happen to others, always wondering when and if the same would happen to me. Now it has, and I fell as if God Himself is punishing me for surviving these three long years of hell. I would like to see home just once more before I leave this world...


ANC-C6846
This artefact belongs to : © National Archives of Canada
Photograph
Imperial War Cabinet
May 1, 1917, 20th century
ANC-C6846
This artefact belongs to : © National Archives of Canada

Comments:

November 30, 1917
I've been sent home due to my present state. I cannot fight the enemy any more, and I'm wondering if this is good or bad for me. I've been away from home for so long now I feel like I have no other life but this one, to just continually fight and fight and fight until you are in the mud either alive or dead. They have told me I am to get a medal, presented by the Imperial War Cabinet themselves. For the services I've done for the Crown. I thanked them heartily enough for the honor, and that I would gladly accept it, but in truth I do not. All of the people I have seen die during the course of my time here deserve it much more than me. They are brave lads all of them, and it will be sad to leave them forever when they send me on the next ship back home.

Keys to History:

A year after Borden's New Year's announcement there had been terrible losses in France and a change of government in Britain, largely engineered by two Canadians, Max Aitken and Arthur Bonar Law. In March 1917 Canada's prime minister joined Dominion colleagues and British ministers in an Imperial War Cabinet. "If we want their men", the new prime minister David Lloyd George told his new adviser Colonel Maurice Hankey, "we must call them to our councils." And he did.

It took a further year of terrible losses at Arras and in the Passchendaele offensive before the British leaders told the Dominion premiers the full truth about the war and listened to their advice. In fact, the experiment was unworkable. Dominion advice led chiefly to involvement in Russia's civil war, while Dominion premiers like Borden could not act as prime ministers when they were far away in London. Nor, when they reckoned up the full cost of the war, would Canadians willingly bear the apparent burdens of a world-wide Empire. Experience backed full sovereignty for Canada and other Dominions, not the imperial federation that had been Borden's dream in 1914.

What:

Never before had leaders from the self-governing colonies been present at a meeting of the British cabinet -- but never before had their support been as vital.

Where:

The photo was taken in the garden behind No. 10 Downing Street in London, the official residence of the British prime minister.

When:

The photograph was taken in March or April, 1917.

Who:

The British prime minister, David Lloyd George, sits between two Canadians at the Imperial War cabinet in 1917. Arthur Bonar-Law, a New Brunswicker who headed the British Conservative party, is on his right, and Sir Robert Borden, the Nova Scotian who headed Canada's government, is on his left. They are surrounded by other British and Dominion leaders and the prime minister's staff.

II-217748.0
© McCord Museum
Photograph
British warship, copied for G. Foster in 1917
Anonyme - Anonymous
1917, 20th century
Silver salts on film - Gelatin silver process
20 x 25 cm
Purchase from Associated Screen News Ltd.
II-217748.0
© McCord Museum

Comments:

December 25, 1917

Today is an odd day for me. Here I am on Christmas, and after a little more then three years, I'm being sent home. This should be the happiest day of my life, and it would be, except only two days ago I learned my Father died.

A few days ago we all heard about a massive explosion in Halifax, but no one knew much. From what we can peice together from reports, a French munitions ship crashed into a Canadian vessel, and a fire caught on board. Alot of people actually ran out to see what happend. Soldiers tried to warn the people, but they would't get back, the sight of the burning ship was just too inviting.

Soon after the boat exploded, wipeing a good portion of Halifax completlly off the map. From what we can tell, at least one thosand people were killed, and theres as many as five thousand dead. My father was one of them, he was working at the ockes when the explosion happened, and he was kille instantly. And so, with my two little brothers and sister for Mom to look after, the army is sending me home.

Im in a sort of shock rate now, I dont know exactly whats going to happen, but I know I shouldnt be leaving the men in the middle of a war. Luckinlly though the germans have been pushed much further back, and it seems like we have the war won. Still, it's not over yet, but I guess for me it is.


VIEW-5792
© McCord Museum
Photograph
Spirit Lake internment camp, Abitibi district, QC, 1916 (?)
Wm. Notman & Son
Probably 1916, 20th century
Silver salts on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
20 x 25 cm
Purchase from Associated Screen News Ltd.
VIEW-5792
© McCord Museum

Comments:

May 7, 1918

Today I visited our Prisoner Of War Camp for the enemy germans. I am happy I did not fight for the germans, now that I look at it. To be stuck in a POW camp during this war would be the most awful thing that could happen, especially knowing you're way behind the enemy lines, where there is noone to rescue you. I looked into the camp, and asked if I could talk to a few that knew english, so that I could tell them of home and the battles and what was happening at the front. The guards obliged me, nd immediatly I was surrounded by germans, men I had fought for years. I realized that they were the same as me in every way, fighting for the other side. Many were happy I was there, for I reminded them of Europe, even though it was the bloody Europe they left behind. I now visit the camp once a month, and we talk of things we remember, and of friends we had, things that happened, our climaxes and our downfalls in the trenches. We talked of home, of whta would happen after the war, our dreams that we wanted, dreams that never came true. But mostly we talked of peace, and how we don't realize how lucky we are when we have peace. I then realized we need to stop bickering amongst ourselves, that there were too many lives lost in war to make it worth the sacrifice for peace. Why start war in the first place? Nothing is accomplished except one side wins and the other loses, while we both suffer form many things.


II-223882.0
© McCord Museum
Photograph
2nd Lieut. D. L. Savage's wooden cross, copied for Mrs. G. Grier in 1918
Anonyme - Anonymous
1918, 20th century
Silver salts on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
17 x 12 cm
Purchase from Associated Screen News Ltd.
II-223882.0
© McCord Museum

Comments:

September 17, 1918

I have returned to Europe to visit my many friends now that the war is over. I visited all of the battlefields I fought at, Hill 70, Vimy, and many others. I spent days searching for friends graves, I thought I would never find them. I finally came upon Thomas's grave next to other's of my regiment, and I sat down in front of him and asked him, why did this happen? And I remember, he gave his life so that others could live. A bullet did this. But why would anyone fire the bullet in the first place? No reason other than hate, or greed, or a lust for power. It all comes down to what the politicians want, I thought to myself. Everyone wants power, and to get it the easy way, they use other people and twist them to their needs. That's what happened here. They call this the war to end all wars. I do not agree. There will always be a lust for power, there will always be one more war, it doesn't matter how many we fight. Humanity must learn to not hate, but live in peace, for who fully understands peace until they have seen war? With that last thought I walk away towards the nearest train station, on my way home. I understand peace and war now. I hope I appreciate the power of what both can do now.


Conclusion:

And so, we end the story of the long hardships this lone soldier faced. This man is of course fictional, but his story isn't quite. The horrors and suffering of the war was not restrained to an individual man, but to millions of soldiers, on either side, who fought and died for their country, family, and beliefs. Perhaps this gave you at least a little insight into what these men faced, and now maybe you'll better understand their sacrafice.

Thank you for your time.


© Musée McCord Museum