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Across Canada by the CPR

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Introduction:

"Across Canada" by the CPR was the first of McGill's illustrated lecture series, and undoubtedly one of the most popular. To promote luxury tourism, encourage immigration and entertain its employees, the rail company offered short and full versions of a 3,500 miles tour across Canada, from Halifax to Victoria.

The 1928 version of this lecture comprises no less than 150 glass slides for the full tour and 85 for the short one.


MP-0000.158.1
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
View of Halifax, with tug "Ragus" in foreground, NS, about 1917
Wallace R. MacAskill
About 1917, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.1
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Halifax, N. S. : Capital and commercial centre of the picturesque province of Nova Scotia, Halifax is charmingly situated on one of the most magnificent natural harbors of the world. It is one of Canada's two Atlantic winter ports, with important trade to Europe, the United States, the West Indies, etc., and is also a large naval and military station. It is strongly fortified, chief of the fortifications being the Citadel, elevated 256 feet above sea-level, and commanding the city and harbor. Halifax was founded in 1749, when 5,000 British immigrants established themselves in an enterprise promoted by the Earl of Halifax. It speedily became a great naval station, from which campaigns were launched against the French and the "Thirteen Colonies." When the independence of the latter was acknowledged, Halifax grew suddenly by the immigration of some thousands of United Empire Loyalists. (Population 72,000.)"

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 1--The Maritime Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.2
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Cornwallis Inn, about 1925
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.2
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Apple Blossom Time in Acadia: From Halifax the Dominion Atlantic Railway, a subsidiary of the Canadian Pacific, crosses the peninsula of Nova Scotia, and follows the western shore line of the province down the Bay of Fundy. This line traverses one of the most beautiful and romantic sections of Canada - the famous "Land of Evangeline", scene of the dramatic poem by Longfellow. The province, during the French regime, was called "Acadia", separate entirely from New France, which latter consisted of Quebec and the interior. The country still retains its agricultural aspect, and is the happy hunting ground of both the artist and holiday-maker. The apples of the Annapolis Valley are celebrated the world over."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 1--The Maritime Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.3
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Acadian Memorial Park, Grand Pré, NS, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.3
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Acadian Memorial Park: The expulsions of the Acadians, on which Longfellow's poem is based, took place in 1755. Evangeline lived (for there is much to suggest historical foundation for the story) at the little village of Grand Pré, in the heart of a rich farming settlement close to the Bay of fundy. Near the station is a row of gnarled willows, and, suitably enclosed, "Evangeline's Well." Near it were unearthed some blacksmith's tools, sufficient to justify the local tradition that this was the site of the village smithy over which "Basil the Blacksmith" presided.A beautiful statue of the French-Canadian sculptor, Henri Hébert, stands in Acadian Memorial Park alongside the railway."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 1--The Maritime Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.4
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Annapolis Royal, NS, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.4
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Annapolis Royal, N.S.: The old historic town of Annapolis Royal was founded by the French, under the name "Port Royal," in 1605, and was for over one hundred and fifty years the scene of part of the long and bitter struggle between French and English for possesion of the New World. From its founding until 1710, when it passed into the hands of the English, its story is an endless succesion of captures, re-captures, and changing masters; and even for forty years after 1710 it was in an almost continous state of siege. The fort is still in good repair, and has been created a National Park. The picture shows the old quarters of the officers, now a museum."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 1--The Maritime Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.5
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
The Pines Hotel, Digby, NS, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.5
© McCord Museum

Description:

"The Pines: At beautiful Digby, the Dominion Atlantic Railway operates The Pines, a quiet, splendidly conducted hotel. It is the centre of Digby's social life in summer."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 1--The Maritime Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.6
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Lakeside Inn, Yarmouth, NS, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.6
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Digby is about three-quarters of the way between Halifax and Yarmouth, and lies opposite Saint John, a three hours' sail across the Bay of Fundy. It is a favorite summer resort, providing excellent bathing, boating, and sea-fishing. Digby is also extensively engaged in fisheries, and gives its name to one popular delicacy -- the "Digby Chiken," a kind of small herring. The picture shows thousands of fish drying -- pollock, haddock and cod."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 1--The Maritime Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.7
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Harbour, St. John, NB, about 1925
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.7
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Saint John, N.B. -- From the Harbor: Saint John, which we reach from Digby by a commodious Canadian Pacific steamer, is the largest city of New Brunswick. It is essentially a maritime city, an important port, one of Canada's two winter ports on the Atlantic, and its fine docks and harbor equipment are very interesting. It has three grain elevators, two of which, with a million bushel capacity each, are operated by the Canadian Pacific, fifteen ocean berths, and a dry dock 1,150 feet in length. Saint John has extensive manufacturing and lumbering interests. The city, which stands at the mouth of the great Saint John River, was founded during the seventeenth century by the French, but its growth dates really from 1783, when five thousand United Empire Loyalists settled here. (Population 68,000.)"

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 1--The Maritime Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.8
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
C. P. R. bridge, Reversing Falls, St. John, NB, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.8
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Saint John -- Reversing Falls: The Bay of Fundy is noted for its tremendous tides. Of these, the most marvellous is at the Reversing falls, at Saint John. The Saint John River, flowing into the Bay, has a drop of from 17 to 25 feet in a narrow gorge of great beauty; but when the tide rises, the water more than overcomes this difference of level. The salt water rises steadily and forces its way with great swiftness up the river bed; as it ebbs again, the half-fresh, half-salt water has to find its way out, and does so at a speed comparable to that of the Niagara Whirlpool. At half-tide vessels can pass safely through the falls."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 1--The Maritime Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.9
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Algonquin Hotel, St.-Andrews-by-the-Sea, NB, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.9
© McCord Museum

Description:

"St. Andrews-by-the-Sea, N.B.: From Saint John the traveller starts for Montreal. Changing at McAdam Junction, about 85 miles distant, he can, after a short run, reach St.-Andrews-by-the-Sea, a pretty and very fashionable sea-shore resort, situated on Passamaquoddy Bay. The Algonquin Hotel -- one of the chain of luxurious Canadian Pacific hotels that span Canada from the Atlantic to Pacific -- is the centre of social life of the resort."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 1--The Maritime Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.10
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Golf Club, Algonquin Hotel, St-Andrews-by-the-Sea, NB, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.10
© McCord Museum

Description:

"St. Andrews--Golfing: St. Andrews as a summer resort is not surpassed by any point on the Atlantic Coast. Its charming scenery, beautiful homes, and excellent bathing, boating and fishing, make it each year the rendez-vous of an increasingly large number of visitors from both Canada and the United States. It has one of the finest natural golf courses in the world, overlooking the Bay."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 1--The Maritime Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.11
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Waterloo Row, Fredericton, NB, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.11
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Fredericton, N.B.: In another direction from the main line from Saint John to Montreal is Fredericton, capital of New Brunswick, founded in 1792. It is rapidly gaining prominence as an industrial centre, and is the site of an Experimental Farm conducted by the Dominion Government. The picture shows part of the beautiful residential section. (Population 8,200)"

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 1--The Maritime Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.12
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Fishing, Cains River, NB, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.12
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Fishing in New Brunswick: The province of New Brunswick is a paradise for sportsmen. Not only are many kinds of big game found within its borders, ranging from the majestic moose downwards, but its countless streams are teeming with fish, including not only trout, bass and the other usual varieties, but also the the lordly salmon. A fishing holiday in New Brunswick is one to be remembered always."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 1--The Maritime Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.13
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Quebec City, from Lévis, QC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.13
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Quebec -- From Levis: For historical associations Quebec will compare with any city of America; for scenery it need fear the rivalry of but few places in the whole world. It occupies the summit and base of a lofty crag projecting into the St. Lawrence. Jaques Cartier, the first European who sailed into the river, spent the winter of 1535 here. Samuel Champlain, in 1608, established a permanent settlement, which for 150 years was the headquarters of French rule in the New World. The world-wide conflict between French and English that raged during the eighteenth century, the Seven Years' War, extended to Canada, and in 1759 the British captured Quebec after one of the most celebrated fights in history. (Notes to picture.--Left to right, the Citadel, the Chateau Frontenac, the Post Office, Laval University and Archbishop's Palace, and the Seminary. The Lower Town along the water's edge.)"

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 2--The Province of Quebec; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.14
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Chateau Frontenac, Quebec City, QC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.14
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Quebec -- The Chateau Frontenac: The Chateau Frontenac, a magnificent hotel operated by the Canadian Pacific Railway, is the most superbly situated hotel in the world. Modelled on the architecture of the seventeenth-century French chateau, it is, although an entirely modern structure, in perfect harmony with the medieval atmosphere of Quebec. In front is the Dufferin Terrace, a famous quarter-mile boardwalk named after a celebrated Governor-General of Canada. Built on the very verge of a cliff, 250 feet high, it commands wonderful views over the St. Lawrence, which here is nearly a mile wide."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 2--The Province of Quebec; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.15
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
The Ramparts, Quebec City, QC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.15
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Quebec -- The Ramparts: This is a quaint corner of the ramparts, which, although now purely ornamental and of no military value, were once impregnable. When the British captured Quebec, it was not by assault upon the main fortifications, but by scaling the cliff above the city, under cover of night."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 2--The Province of Quebec; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.16
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Little Champlain Street, Quebec City, QC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.16
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Quebec -- Lower Town: Quebec has the most distinctive atmosphere of any city in America. To this, its Lower Town contributes very notably. Quaint narrow streets, with high old buildings on either side, are a source of interest to the visitor, who can trace in them reminiscences of the historic past. This is a view of Little Champlain Street in the Lower Town. (Population of Quebec, 125,000)"

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 2--The Province of Quebec; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.

Keys to History:

The best place of all to play is the street, isn't it? Well, not according to the ladies belonging to the Parks and Playgrounds Associations, who were determined to get kids off the streets and into playgrounds. The streets were considered dangerous not only because of the increasing traffic but also because of the strangers who came into contact with the unsupervised children. Providing children with special places to play was one way of giving children a proper education, the elite believed. The idea was that children could be protected, and moulded, more easily if they were kept apart from the adult world.

What:

Little Champlain Street, narrow and lined on both sides with adjoining brick houses, was a favourite playground for children.

Where:

Quebec City's Lower Town has long been a favourite of photographers. Its narrow streets and old houses make it very different from other communities in North America.

When:

This photograph, taken in 1923, is particularly striking for its reminder of what city life was like in the 19th century.

Who:

Throughout the ages, children have always loved playing in the street.

MP-0000.158.17
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
S. S. "Empress of Britain", Canadian Pacific Steamship Line, about 1934
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1934, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.17
© McCord Museum

Description:

""Empress of Australia." Quebec is the Canadian summer port of several vessels of the Canadian Pacific Atlantic steamship fleet. These include the magnificent "Empress of Australia" (21,500 gross tons), "Empress of Scotland" (25,000 gross tons), and "Empress of France" (18,500 gross tons), sailing to Cherbourg and Southampton. This express service, giving as it does two days on the sheltered St. Lawrence and four days only on the open sea, is the ideal route to Europe.In addition to the Empress steamships, the Canadian Pacific operates from Quebec and Montreal (or from Saint John in winter) a fleet of cabin class steamships to Liverpool, Cherbourg, Southampton, Belfast, Glasgow, Hamburg and Antwerp. These steamships provide only one class of cabin accomodation, instead of two. This service has been augmented by the appearance of the new Canadian Pacific "Duchess" steamships, the largest and finest cabin class steamships on the St. Lawrence."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 2--The Province of Quebec; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.18
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Religious procession, Ste Anne de Beaupré, QC, about 1925
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.18
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Ste. Anne de Beaupré: About 20 miles from Quebec, and reached by electric railway, is Ste. Anne de Beaupré, a famous Catholic shrine to which wonder-working qualities are ascribed. Tradition says it was founded in the sixteenth century by storm-driven French sailors who had vowed to erect a shrine where they landed if their lives were spared. Hundreds of thousands of pilgrims go every year to Ste. Anne, especially during July. The curative powers of the shrine are attested by huge pyramids of crutches and sticks discarded by invalids who have been cured of their infirmities by the intervention of "La Bonne Sainte-Anne.""

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 2--The Province of Quebec; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.19
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Winter sports in Quebec: dog sledding, QC, about 1934
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1934, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.19
© McCord Museum

Description:

"French-Canadian Rural Life: Throughout the entire province of Quebec one finds quiet, shaded country roads, where life proceeds in a leisurely way, almost undisturbed by the bustle and hurry of the outside world. The scene shows a tree-lined road at Ste. Genevieve, near Montreal."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 2--The Province of Quebec; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.20
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Fishing in the Laurentian Mountains, QC, about 1928
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1928, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.20
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Fishing in Quebec: Canada is singularly rich in wild life, and affords the hunter and fisherman much fine sport. The Province of Quebec, especially, has large areas in which big game and excellent fishing can be obtained."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 2--The Province of Quebec; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.21
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Drilling a hole for a tap, maple sugar industry, QC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.21
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Maple Sugar Industry, Quebec: The maple sugar industry is an important agricultural side line in the Province of Quebec, and its development is being materially assisted by the Provincial Government. The trees are tapped in the early spring, when the snow begins to melt. After a hole has been bored, in the way here seen, a spout is placed therein and the maple sap runs out into a pail."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 2--The Province of Quebec; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.22
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Asbestos mining industry, QC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.22
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Asbestos Mining in Quebec: The Eastern Townships of Quebec produce almost ninety per cent of the world-supply of asbestos. The mines are, in most cases, vast open quarries, sometimes 500 feet deep, from which the rock is blasted and lifted to the mills. Asbestos was discovered in Quebec in 1860. Commercial production began in 1878. To-day it is one of Canada's great industries."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 2--The Province of Quebec; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.23
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Girls' camp near Sainte Marguerite, Laurentian Mountains, QC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.23
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Summer days in the Laurentians: Montrealers are fortunate in that they have, almost at their very door, an exceptionally fine holiday region -- the Laurentian Mountains.A short train ride north to St. Jerome, and from there on, rising gradually to a height of over 1,300 feet and descending again, the journey is for over a hundred miles through an enchanting district of mountain, lake, stream and wood. Thousands of visitors every year throng the numerous resorts which have arisen, of which the chief are Ste. Agathe, Val Morin, St. Faustin, St. Jovite. Mont Tremblant, etc. -- places whose very names are delicious and which offer every kind of amusement that simple or cultivated tastes calls for. This picture shows a girls' camp near Ste. Marguerite."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 2--The Province of Quebec; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.24
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
View from Mount Royal, Montreal, QC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1920, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.24
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Montreal -- From the Mountain: Montreal, chief city and commercial capital of Canada, is situated on an island formed by the St. Lawrence and Ottawa Rivers, on the site of the ancient Indian village of Hochelaga, visited by Jaques Cartier in 1535. The city has a far-reaching trade and great manufacturing establishments, and is the headquarters of the Canadian Pacific Railway. The Company`s Angus Shops, claimed to be the largest and most modernly equipped on the continent, at which over 6,000 men are employed, are situated here. Prominent from every part of Montreal is Mount Royal, a large public reservation. (The population of Greater Montreal is over 1,000,000, of which about three-fourths are French-speaking.)"

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 2--The Province of Quebec; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MISSING.158.25
© McCord Museum
Photo not available
MISSING.158.25
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Montreal -- The Harbor: Montreal not only enjoys the distinction of being a great ocean port nearly a thousand miles inland, but in point of foreign commerce is the second port in North America. The city is 250 miles above salt water, but is 315 miles nearer to Liverpool than is New York. The broad St. Lawrence forms a highway upon which ocean-going steamers of 20,000 tons can safely ascend to Montreal. Montreal has many miles of fine wharves of concrete, vast warehouses, huge grain elevators with a total capacity of 15,000,000 bushels, and the largest floating dry dock in the world. The Port of Montreal is now the largest grain-exporting port in the world, and in 1927 handled 195,000,000 bushels."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 2--The Province of Quebec; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.26
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Chateau de Ramezay, Montreal, QC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.26
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Montreal -- The Chateau de Ramezay: Although one of the busiest cities of Canada, Montreal has a very historical atmosphere and confronts the visitor at many points with links with the great past. The city, established by Maisonneuve in 1642, was for a number years the focal point in the struggle between French and Indians, and later between French and British. It was the last place yielded by the French in 1760. The Chateau de Ramezay was the official residence of the French Governors, and, preserved now as a museum, is the repository of a very valuable collection of historical documents, pictures and curiosities. The American visitor especially may be interested that it was here that Benjamin Franklin, in the troublous days of the War of Independence, started a newspaper in Montreal in an unsuccesful endeavor to induce the Canadians to rebel against British rule."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 2--The Province of Quebec; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.27
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Saint James Cathedral, Montreal, QC, about 1934
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1934, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.27
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Montreal -- Place Viger Hotel: Amongst its many good hotels, Montreal has the Place Viger, erected and operated by the Canadian Pacific Railway. This imposing structure in named in honor of the first mayor of Montreal. Although located amidst historical, quiet and restful surroundings, the hotel is only a few minutes' walk from the business portion of the city and the steamship docks. Behind the hotel is Place Viger Station, terminal of Canadian pacific lines to the Laurentian Mountains, Quebec, the North Shore of the Ottawa River, etc."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 2--The Province of Quebec; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.28
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Dominion Square, Montreal, QC, about 1934
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1934, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.28
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Montreal -- Windsor Street Station: Windsor Street Station, facing Dominion Square, is the headquarters of the Canadian Pacific Railway system. This, the greatest transportation system in the world, operates or controls a mileage of track of 20,146 miles. It has 2,255 locomotives, over 2,800 passenger cars, and 90,881 freight cars, numbers which are continually being increased. It has its own telegraph system, with 138,564 miles of wire; 15 high-class hotels; 74 steamships plying the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, the Great Lakes, and the coast and inland lakes of British Columbia; about 5,400,000 acres of good agricultural land in the Provinces of Manitoba, Alberta, Saskatchewan and British Columbia; and coal mines, timber limits and sundry other activities. It has in its permanent employ, exclusive of allied interests, about 65,000 employees."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 2--The Province of Quebec; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.29
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Map of the Canadian Pacific Railway system, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.29
© McCord Museum

Description:

The Canadian Pacific Railroad, a huge achievement, runs from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific. Although its numerous branch lines cover almost all the landmass of Canada, its backbone is still the Montreal-Vancouver line, over 4,600 kilometres long. The network is complemented by a series of shipping routes, most importantly on the Great Lakes and the West Coast.


MP-0000.158.30
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Canadian Pacific train leaving Windsor Station, Montreal, QC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.30
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Canadian Pacific Train, "Trans-Canada Limited": The Canadian Pacific has in summer three transcontinental trains a day crossing Canada, of which one, the "Trans-Canada Limited," is the fastest long distance train on this continent. It covers the distance form Montreal to Vancouver, 2,886 miles, in 89¼ hours, and from Toronto to Vancouver, 2,706 miles, in 85½ hours. The train is seen here leaving Windsor Street Station, Montreal. The other two transcontinental trains (running all year) are the "Imperial" and "Vancouver Express," the former from Montreal and the latter from Toronto, both to Vancouver. Through trains are also operated in summer from Chicago to Vancouver, of which the "Mountaineer" is a famous limited train."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 2--The Province of Quebec; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.31
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Parliament buildings, Ottawa, ON, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.31
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Ottawa: The Federal capital of the Dominion of Canada is picturesquely situated at the junction of the Rideau and Ottawa Rivers. Ottawa (population 120,000) is the residence of the Governor-General of Canada, the meeting-place of the house of Commons and the Senate, and the headquarters of the administrative departments of the Governments. The city stands on high ground and contains many stately buildings and fine residences. The Parliament Buildings have now been reconstructed after the disastrous fire which destroyed them in February, 1916, the main building, seen here, being entirely new. Tributary to Ottawa are large lumbering districts, such as the Gatineau Valley, and the Chaudiere Falls afford water-power for, amongst other industries, a host of sawmills."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.32
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Silver Mine, Cobalt, ON, about 1918
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1918, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.32
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Cobalt: A little over a hundred miles north of North Bay, which is 250 miles west of Ottawa on the Canadian Pacific main line, is Cobalt, one of the most famous silver-mining districts in the world. The presence here of this precious metal was discovered in 1903, and up to the end of 1925, 364,713,760 ounces of silver have been taken out. In the year of 1925 the production was 10,529,131 ounces. The picture shows a general view of a Cobalt silver mine. Further north yet is the rich Porcupine gold-mining district, which is now by far the greatest gold-producing district of Canada."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.

Keys to History:

In Cobalt, as elsewhere in other mining regions, environmental issues were obviously not a top priority. As the silver-bearing veins ran towards the lakes in the area, the companies pleaded with the government to sell mining claims to the lakebeds. That is how Sir Henry Pellatt's Cobalt Lake Mining purchased, for close to $2 million, the exclusive right to mine the 47 acres of Cobalt Lake. At the outset of the First World War, the lake was drained, killing huge numbers of fish. Progress-and profits!-would not be stopped.

What:

The Cobalt Lake Mining mill dominated the landscape. Large silver nuggets gradually gave way to less valuable ore. That is why the mining companies built mills to crush the mineral-bearing rock and process it chemically to extract the silver.

Where:

Other mining companies besides Cobalt Lake Mining built their headframes on the shores of Cobalt Lake and many of them dumped their waste on the banks.

When:

This photograph probably dates from the end of the First World War, when the silver mines were already experiencing a fairly swift decline in production.

Who:

In 1916 Sir Henry Pellatt was one of the founders of the Mining Corporation of Canada, which brought together a number of mining companies. A few years later, the cumulative dividends paid out by these companies amounted to $5 million.

MP-0000.158.33
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Copper converters, nickel industry, Sudbury, ON, about 1920
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1920, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.33
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Nickel Industry, Sudbury: Eighty miles further west of North Bay, junction point for Toronto. Near Sudbury are the greatest nickel mines in the world, supplying over two-thirds of the world's consumption of this metal. The area of the "nickel basin" is about 550 square miles. Smelting is carried on a short distance from the city, the process removing the large iron content and producing nickel-copper matte suitable for refining. The nickel content averages 3.09 per cent, and the copper content 2.12 per cent. Copper converters are seen in the picture."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.

Keys to History:

Although the Sudbury ore had a low copper and nickel content, there was a lot of it. And mining in huge tunnels allowed an extremely refined division of labour underground, unlike any other mine in the North. The ore required complex metallurgical processing to extract its market value. It had to go through a number of steps to remove the impurities, chiefly sulphur, which the converters, used in the last stage of smelting, turned into gas. The gas, vented through tall stacks, produced sulphur dioxide, which polluted the region considerably. A few smelters provided employment for several hundred workers, but they had to put in long hours.

What:

An interior view of the building housing the British American Nickel Company (BANCO) converters. The three converters eliminated the impurities by turning them into gas or a liquid waste called slag.

Where:

BANCO operated the Murray mine near Sudbury and built its smelter at the aptly named Nickelton.

When:

The photo likely dates from the summer of 1920, when the company had just started up. Operations were interrupted in 1921, however, due to a sharp decline in the demand for nickel. The decline persisted, and operations stopped for good in 1924.

Who:

One of the senior foremen of the company was H. L. Roscoe, who later played a key role in setting up Noranda Mines in Abitibi.

MP-0000.158.34
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Paper mill, Espanola, ON, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.34
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Paper Mills, Espanola: Canada is now one of the largest pulp and paper producing countries in the world, having actually overtaken the United States. The industry is distributed widely over the Dominion and has become one of the most important industries of Canada. In 1925, the total production of wood pulp was 2,2772,507 tons, of which about 70% was converted into paper in Canada and the remainder exported, mostly to the United States. This view is of a large mill in the Algoma country, between Sudbury and Sault Ste. Marie."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.35
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Hydraulic lift lock, Peterborough, ON, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.35
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Lift-Lock, Peterboro: We will for a short time retrace our steps. one very important Canadian Pacific line is that which runs from Montreal to Toronto, and thence to Detroit, where connection is made with Chocago. This Monteal-Toronto line has two branches, one via Peterboro, the other following the shore line of Lake Ontario. Peterboro has an interesting engineering structure in its hydraulic lift-lock, the highest lift-lock in the world. This [with a similar lock at Kirkfield] forms the connecting link between levels on the Trent waterway, which forms a line of water communication between Georgian Bay and Lake Ontario. It overcomes a difference in levels at this point of 65 feet, obviating the necessity for five locks of the ordinary type. The chambers, 140 feet long, 33 feet wide and carrying 8½ feet of water, will lift a vessel from the lower to the higher level, by hydraulic power, in 12 minutes."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.36
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Fishermen in the Kawartha Lake district, ON, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.36
© McCord Museum

Description:

"The Kawartha Lakes (Otonabee River): (The Otonabee River, flowing thru') Peterboro is the eastern gateway to the beautiful Kawartha Lake district -- a chain of fourteen lakes that constitute one of the most popular of Ontario's summer playgrounds. The region, enjoying very agreeable climatic conditions, affords almost unlimited oppurtunities for sailing, canoeing, yachting and motor-boating, and is particularly attractive to the fisherman, especially for small-mouth bass and maskinonge -- which are caught in the larger lakes -- while there is good fishing for speckled trout in some of the smaller lakes. Bobcaygeon, at the central part of the region, reached direct from Toronto, is another very popular point."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA WITH THE C.P.R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.37
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Provincial parliament buildings, Toronto, ON, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.37
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Toronto -- Provincial Parliament Buildings: Toronto (population 650,000), capital of Ontario and second largest city of Canada, is situated on Lake Ontario. Often called the "Queen City," it has immense manufacturing establishments and some of the largest commercial houses in the country. Its educational institutions are well known, as also are its beauty and commercial enterprise. Many of its people are of English and Scotch extraction, but the city is distinctively North American in the intensity of its activity and energy. "The most ambitious city in Canada" is often said of Toronto. Toronto is the centre of a large railway system radiating in all directions. Eastward it is connected with Montreal; westward, with London, Windsor, Detroit and Chicago; while northward a very important branch of the Canadian Pacific runs through Ontario and along the shores of Georgian Bay, connecting at Sudbury with the main line. We shall travel this line shortly. Through trains leave Toronto daily for Vancouver."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.38
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Royal York Hotel, Toronto, ON, drawing, about 1927
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1927, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.38
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Royal York Hotel, Toronto: A magnificent new hotel, the Royal York, is being erected at Toronto by the Canadian Pacific railway. Facing the Union Station, it will be the largest hotel in the British Empire, with about 1,100 rooms; one of the features will be the generous provision for holding conventions, it being possible to seat 4,070 people on the convention floor alone. The Royal York Hotel is expected to open in June, 1929."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.39
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
The Midway, Canadian National Exhibition, Toronto, ON, about 1925
Brigden
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.39
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Toronto Exhibition: Toronto is the scene every fall of the Canadian National Exhibition -- the biggest thing of its kind in the world. Representative displays of every kind of Canadian product are brought together here, while in addition there are always numerous attractions in the main enclosure, to say nothing of the "Midway" with its countless side shows. The attendance at this Exhibition during the two weeks of its being open runs up to the two million mark."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.

Keys to History:

At the end of the 19th century, attending an industrial exhibition represented one of the best ways for people to enjoy an outing while learning about the latest technological advances. Conceived to introduce the public to the products of the Industrial Revolution, to praise the merits of Canadian industrial and agriculture products and to instruct people in a pleasant way, such exhibitions were very popular during this period.

They were usually held annually in rural communities and big cities. People flocked to them to learn about the most recent scientific and technological inventions, and to get a chance to try out items such as the telephone that they didn't personally own. In fact, despite their great utility and appeal, the telephone and home appliances long remained out of reach for all but the wealthiest families.

What:

This photograph shows a long line of booths exhibiting a multitude of products such as furniture, tools, beauty products, clothes, toys and food.

Where:

To this day, the Canadian National Exhibition is held annually in Toronto. After 1904, it became Canada's most important commercial exhibition.

When:

The Great Exhibition of 1851 in London was the first international exhibition of manufactured products. Of the many exhibitions that followed it, few attained its splendour.

Who:

Industrial exhibitions were designed to appeal to everyone: city and country folk, rich and poor, young and old, women and men.

MP-0000.158.40
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
A commercial street in Hamilton, ON, about 1918
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1918, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.40
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Hamilton: Hamilton, at the west end of Lake Ontario and 40 miles south-west of Toronto, is the third most important manufacturing city of Canada as regards value of output. In recent years, a large number of important industries of the United States have established branch factories here. With cheap electrical power from the Niagara Falls, natural gas and excellent shipping facilities by both rail and water, it has over 700 manufacturing estabishments; and is also situated in the heart of the Niagara fruit district. (Population 124,000)"

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.

Keys to History:

The new leisure activities of the 20th century

The early 20th century was the dawn of a new era in the history of leisure, the coming of what today is known as mass entertainment. The commercial leisure activities of the late 19th century - amusement parks, freak shows, horse races and professional sports, to name a few - had been only the beginning. Anyone who had paid the price of an entry ticket could enjoy them, in contrast to the days when the elite controlled access to leisure through restrictions based primarily on social status, religion and wealth. Leisure for the masses meant leisure for the general public. The businessmen who organized these new forms of entertainment were mainly interested in attracting large audiences in order to maximize their profits. They were not concerned about educating or improving people as it was the case before, but about entertaining them.

What:

The downtown streets provided most of the commercial leisure. Among other recreations to be found there was shopping.

Where:

Canadian cities of all sizes, not just the largest, offered a range of mass entertainments.

When:

The economic boom that accompanied the arrival of the 20th century was a key factor in the development of mass entertainment.

Who:

The entertainment businesses tried to lure young customers, in particular, those with jobs.

MP-0000.158.41
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
American and Canadian falls, Niagara Falls, ON-NY, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.41
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Niagara Falls: Fifty-one miles beyond Hamilton one reaches the Niagara Falls, which, although perhaps not the largest waterfalls of the world, are easily the most famous and one the commonest standards by which bigness is judged. The height of the Falls on the Canadian side is 158 feet. They attract, every year, hundreds of thousands of visitors from all parts of the world, and in addition, now play an extraordinarily important part in industry, because of the enormous amount of electric power that is developed for industrial purposes. The amount of waterpower actually available is 56,000 cubic feet per second (equal to 650,000 h.p), of which about two-thirds are on the Canadian side. This may be indicative of the wealt of eceonomic resources in Canada: there are, for instance, over 2,305,000 h.p. in developed waterpower contiguous to the Canadian Pacific system."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.42
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Street scene, London, ON, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.42
© McCord Museum

Description:

"London, Ontario: This London, like its great prototype in the old world, stands on a River Thames in a county of Middlesex, and has a Piccadilly, St. Paul's Cathedral and other familiar landmarks. In fact, the whole Western Ontario peninsula, through which we are now travelling, is plentifully endowed with place-names indicative of the British nationality of the original settlers -- such as Dumfries, Woodstock, Windsor, Stratford, Essex, Perth, Chatham, and so on. The site of London was originally intended as that of the capital of the Province of Upper Canada, now Ontario, but final choice fell upon Toronto. London, half-way between Toronto and Detroit, is a highly important manufacturing city producing a large number of commodities, and possesing some very beautiful residential features. (Population 65,000.)"

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.43
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Street scene, Windsor, ON, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.43
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Windsor, Ontario: Windsor (population 53,000) has within the past few years developed rapidly from an agricultural centre to an important manufacturing city with a large and varied output. This growth it owes to a great extent to the fact that only the narrow Detroit River separates it from the United States, and that a large number of American industries establishing Canadian plants have found this ease of access very desirable. Across the river is Detroit, world-famous as the headquarters of the automoblie industry. So far through train from Montreal to Chicago has travelled on Canadian Pacific metal, but from Detroit onwards it uses the Michigan Central."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.44
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Beach scene, Muskoka, ON, about 1925
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.44
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Muskoka: North from Toronto, as has already been said, the Canadian Pacific runs to connect with the main line at Sudbury. This line, which for a considerable distance follows the shore of Georgian Bay, taps a very rich holiday district -- or rather, series of districts. The first of them is the famous Muskoka district, one of the most popular summer resorts in Canada. Bala Station is the gateway to this delightful region. The principal lakes are three in number -- Muskoka, Joseph and Rosseau. These, with lively watercourses flowing into and connecting them, afford opportunity for every kind of aquatic sport; and that the Muskoka region is highly popular, especially in the "dog days" when cities are sweltering under heat waves, can be gleaned from the large number of settlements around the shores, and the numerous hotels, some of large size, which offer a range of accommodation and price to suit every purse and taste."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.45
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
String of fish, Pointe au Baril, ON, about 1925
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.45
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Pointe au Baril: Sixty miles north of Muskoka, we are at Pointe au Baril, the picturesqueness of which is so exceptional that is has become one of the premier outdoor resorts in the province. It is the centre of a very large area; it is fortunate in having excellent hotels, and its advantages as a recreation field are so appreciated that a large number of permanent summer cottages have been established among the islands of the colony. There are also a number of camps withing easy canoe reach. Owing to protection by the outer fringe of islands, the inner waters are warm and pleasant for bathing; and many islands, unlike most localities of rocky formation, are partially surrounded with sandy beaches.The vicinity of Pointe au Baril offers first-class fishing. Black bass, pickerel, pike and maskinonge abound in these waters."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.46
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Bungalow camp at French River, ON, about 1925
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.46
© McCord Museum

Description:

"French River: Richly endowed with natural beauty, historical interest and sporting advantages, French River is one of the most desirable vacation districts in Ontario. Within the last few years it has become highly popular because of the establishment here of a Bungalow camp, which, charmingly located on a rocky bluff, commands a magnificent panoramic view of the river for some miles. The camp consists of a number of small bungalows accomodating one, two or four people, and a large central building for dining and recreational purposes. It is close to good fishing grounds, and a supplementary camp has been established at another fishing spot, Pine Rapids, at some distance from the main camp."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.47
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Fishing at French River, ON, about 1925
Brigden
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.47
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Fishing at French river: French River is in reality a chain of small lakes connecting Lake Nipissing on the east with Georgian Bay. In these vast fishing wilds, bass, maskinonge ("lunge"), pike and pickerel offer great sport for the fisherman, while for the hunter there is the best of deer shooting to be had, some bear, and an abundance of small fur-bearing animals and game birds."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.48
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Shooting the French River Rapids, ON, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.48
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Shooting the Rapids: This picture, which is taken near French River, shows an exciting moment. The district affords some remarkably fine canoe trips of long or short duration, providing a chance to get right into the heart of the real "woods" country."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.49
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Bow of Great Lakes steamship nearing Port McNicoll, Georgian Bay, ON, about 1935
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1935, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.49
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Great Lakes Steamships: An extremely agreeable variation to the railway journey during the summer months is a trip up the Great Lakes by a Canadian Pacific steamer, plying both from Port McNicoll and Owen Sound on Georgian Bay to Fort William. Three sailings a week are maintained each way, and the trip takes a little less than two days."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.50
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Great Lakes steamer "Assiniboia", Canadian Pacific Line, ON, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.50
© McCord Museum

Description:

"At Sea -- Great Lakes: These steamers are Clyde-built, offering luxurious accomodation for three hundred passengers. Plenty of breezes, beautiful scenery and a comfortable ship-life make this two-day trip one to be cherished in the memory. We come out from Georgian Bay, cross Lake Huron, and the next day reach Sault Ste. Marie."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.51
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Deck scene, on one of the Canadian Pacific Line's Great Lakes steamships, ON, about 1935
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1935, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.51
© McCord Museum

Description:

"On Board Ship: Sunny decks, attentive stewards. and "in-between" meals add to the pleasure of the voyage. As far as service and attention go, you will find it difficult to remember this is not an ocean-voyage on a crack Transatlantic liner."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.52
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Dining room, in one of the Canadian Pacific Line's Great Lakes steamships, ON, about 1935
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1935, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.52
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Saulte Ste. Marie -- Locks: At Sault Ste. Marie the Province of Ontario juts west to meet the State of Michigan on the other side of St. Mary River. An important branch of the Canadian Pacific crosses the river here on the largest bascule bridge in the world.The St. Mary River compresses here into swift rapids. To overcome these, two canals have been built, one on the Canadian and one on the American side. The Canadian canal is 7,472 feet long and raises the water-level 18 feet. The annual tonnage passing through the two canals in some years surpasses the annual tonnage of either the Suez or Panama Canal.From the canal we enter Lake Superior. It is a run of over 18 hours to Port Arthur. On Lake Superior we lose sight of land entirely, so vast is this great inland sea. Our lake journey ends at Fort William. (See No. 56.)"

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.53
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Canadian Pacific Line's steamship "Assiniboia" in locks, Sault-Sainte-Marie, ON, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.53
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Lake Superior -- North Shore: If we prefer the rail journey, after leaving Sudbury we travel for several hours through a vast forested region and then emerge upon the shores of Lake Superior. This wonderful lake is seen from the train, and the rocky shore and deep cuttings through which the line runs give the traveller a very impressive idea of the difficulties which the builders of the railway encountered and conquered. The rock through which we tunnel, as seen in the promontory in this picture, is said to be the oldest rock known to geologists."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.54
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Railway track and tunnel, north shore of Lake Superior, ON, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.54
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Nipigon -- Bungalow Camp: At Nipigon River is another Bungalow Camp, similar in character to that at french River. (See No. 46)"

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.55
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Harbour, Port Arthur, ON, about 1935
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1935, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.55
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Trout Fishing at Nipigon: In the clear cold water of all the streams flowing into Lake Superior are speckled trout of remarkable size, with fighting qualities that prove them to be the gamest of all the finny tribe."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.56
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Elevators, Fort William, ON, about 1925
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.56
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Fort William: Fort William, at the head of Lake Superior, is, with its twin city, Port Arthur, Canada's greatest grain port, at which the huge grain crop of Western Canada every year comes into contact with commerce (See Number 62). Hauled hither by railway cars, the grain is consolidated into great bulk, transferred to lake steamers, and by them carried down the Great Lakes to Port McNicoll, Buffalo and other ports. The total capacity of the thirty terminal elevators is in excess of 54,000,000 bushels, the largest having a capacity of 10,000,000 bushels. The Kaministikwia River, flowing into the lake, has been dredged out so that the largest freighters can have easy access to the dock. Three big elevators are seen at the right. (Population of "Twin Cities," 40,000.)"

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.57
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Devil's Gap Lodge, Kenora, ON, about 1925
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.57
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Kenora: Leaving Fort William, the railway enters a somewhat sparsely settled district of dense forests, lakes, streams and rock. For over three hundred miles we are still in the Province of Ontario, which corresponds roughly with this great bush country. A very important pulp industry has been developed, the centres of which are Dryden and Lake of the Woods. Kenora, the chief town of this district, lies at the northern end of Lake of the Woods, a large beautiful expanse of water extending seventy-five miles south to to Rainy River, and dotted as it is with hundreds of islands, it is a favorite summer resort for Winnipeg people. Another delightful Canadian Pacific Bungalow camp has been established here, similar to those at French River and Nipigon."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 3--The Province of Ontario; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.58
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Canadian Pacific Railway station and Royal Alexandra Hotel, Winnipeg, MB, about 1925
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.58
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Winnipeg -- Canadian Pacific Station and Hotel: Leaving Kenora, we soon enter the Province of Manitoba and in a few miles reach Winnipeg, metropolis of the New West. From a mere trading post, Winnipeg has risen in a little under fifty years to the position of one of the most handsome and progressive cities of the continent. It is the greatest grain market of the British Empire, the railway centre of Western Canada, and a great distributing and manufacturing point. The Royal Alexandra, owned and operated by the Canadian Pacific Railway, ranks amongst the finest hotels in Canada and has been extended to twice its original size. It adjoins the Company`s magnificent railway station."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 4--The Prairie Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.59
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Street scene, Winnipeg, MB, 1919
Anonyme - Anonymous
1919, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.59
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Winnipeg -- Street Scene: The rise of Winnipeg from "Fort Garry" with a population, in 1871, of 215, to its present position of third largest city of Canada (population 285,000), has been phenomonal. Commanding the trade of a vast region to the north, east and west, it is handsomely built, and has parks, hospitals, great flour mills, grain elevators, huge abattoirs, the largest stock yards in Canada, and many fine public buildings, including the Provincial Parliament building. Immense Canadian Pacific railway yards -- with 314 miles of tracks -- testify to the city's enormous trade, of which the major part is grain. Within 100 miles the city has sufficient power for manufacturing purposes to supply the needs of a population of over 1,500,000 and to turn out products worth in neighborhood of eighty million dollars annually."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 4--The Prairie Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.

Keys to History:

The war caused prices of almost all consumer goods to rocket. Canadian workers joined the unions in unheard-of numbers to try and cope with inflation by getting higher wages. Considering that the war was also an opportunity to rein in the worst abuses of the economic system, they demanded the recognition of unions and better working conditions. But both the federal government and the private-sector employers ignored these demands. The leaders of the union movement were not even invited to join the federal bodies organizing the war effort, unlike their British and French counterparts. The workers' frustration grew, union activity became more frenetic, and in 1918 strikes spread like wildfire. In 1919 Canada's unionized workers were determined to make quantifiable gains. In Winnipeg they resorted to a general strike to make their point.

What:

In 1919 Winnipeg, capital of the Prairies, looked very modern with its wide paved roads, parked cars and tall buildings.

Where:

The city was also known as the home of the greatest concentration of trades unions west of Ontario. In compensation for their willing sacrifices during the war, the unions demanded better wages and official recognition.

When:

On 15 May 1919, when negotiations broke down between the owners and the construction and metallurgy unions, the Winnipeg Trades and Labour Council called a general strike.

Who:

In the following hours 30,000 workers stopped work. A strike committee organized essential services, alarming the middle classes of Winnipeg and the federal government, who feared a Bolshevik-style riot. The strike ended on 25 June, after the arrest of ten ringleaders and an armed intervention by the mounted police.

MP-0000.158.60
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Ploughing, Western Canada, about 1925
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.60
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Western Canada -- Ploughing: We are now entering the great prairie region of the Canadian West. Beginning a few miles east of Winnipeg, the prairie stretches roughly speaking as far as Calgary, over 800 miles distant, and due north from the International boundary between Canada and the United States for least at least 300 miles. This vast region, the world`s "last Great West," forms a mammoth agricultural area of almost limitless possibilities. The three Prairie Provinces, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, contain a land area of 466,000,000 acres. Of this amount, the conservative estimate has been made that 167,000,000 acres are first-class agricultural land that will raise the finest of crops. Western Canada, indeed, does produce wheat, oats, barley and other cereals in great quantity and of the finest quality -- the latter being attested by the large number of prizes that Canadian wheat has won at international competitions."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 4--The Prairie Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.61
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Cutting and binding wheat, Western Canada, about 1925
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.61
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Reaping: The last picture was of ploughing, the first operation in the farmer's year; this is reaping, which is one of the last. A Western farm will run anywhere from a quarter-section (160 acres) to 10,000 acres, but it by no means follows that the fortunate owner of such a big farm began as a capitalist. On the contrary, the majority of Western farmers began in a very small way. Such splendid crops can be obtained, and the land is so cheap, that a few years' hard work will generally put one on the high road to a comfortable competence."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 4--The Prairie Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.62
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Threshing wheat, Western Canada, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.62
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Threshing: After reaping comes threshing, which in the West is done in the open field. The man on the wagon is feeding sheaves into the separator, which is driven by the tractor to the left. The threshed grain is coming down a spout into the other wagon immediately in front, and the straw is flying out at the right. Machinery is playing every year an increasingly large part in agricultural production in Western Canada, and in ploughing, reaping and sundry other operations is superseding horse-power. Western Canada produced in 1927 over 420,000,000 bushels of wheat alone. (For current statistics of agriculture production, see "Canada Year Book.")"

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 4--The Prairie Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MISSING.158.63
© McCord Museum
Photo not available
MISSING.158.63
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Grain Elevators: The threshed wheat is finally hauled to the nearest railway and marketed, which can be done by one ot three methods. It can be loaded direct into a freight car, consigned to a broker at Winnipeg or Chicago, and sold on commission ; stored in an elevator and later shipped in the same way ; or sold outright to the elevator for spot cash. A large part of the wheat crop in the West is now sold through a co-operative association. We saw at Fort William some of the terminal elevators ; here are some "country elevators", which, consolidating in a preliminary manner the individual consignments of grain, form the first link in the chain that takes wheat from Western Canada to Europe. There are 4,316 of these country elevators in the West, with a capacity of over 147,896,700 bushels."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 4--The Prairie Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.64
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Experimental farm, Indian Head, SK, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.64
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Indian Head -- Experimental farm: Indian Head, a prosperous town of Eastern Saskatchewan, has a Government Experimental farm, one of a number of such at different points in the West for applying scientific methods to the improvement of agricultural practice."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 4--The Prairie Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.65
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Cattle, Western Canada, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.65
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Cattle: Western Canada is not only famous for wheat -- it is also a great stock-raising region. Before grain was raised to any extent, in fact, the country was devoted to ranching on an extensive scale. The big ranches have now practically disappeared, but stock-raising is more popular than ever, only instead of one man owning several thousand head of cattle, there are now several thousand men each owning herds of any size up to several hundred. There are about 3,528,410 cattle in Western Canada."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 4--The Prairie Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.66
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Hogs, Western Canada, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.66
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Hogs: Hog-raising, also, has vastly increased of late years. The number of hogs raised in Western Canada has increased from 806,000 in 1912 to 1,674,560 in 1926. Hog-raising is one of the most profitable phases of farming."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 4--The Prairie Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.67
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Horses, Western Canada, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.67
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Horses: In an agricultural country, there is a constant demand for horses, a demand that has been accentuated by the European shortage. The number of horses in the West is about 2,731,996. Here are heavy draught horses on an Alberta farm."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 4--The Prairie Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.68
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Hotel Saskatchewan, Regina, SK, 1927-28
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1927, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.68
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Regina: Regina is the capital of the Province of Saskatchewan, and the most important distributing point in the southern part of the province. Saskatchewan is the greatest wheat producing region of Canada. (Population 38,000.)Here is a view of the Hotel Saskatchewan, opened in 1927, one of the finest hotels in Canada, owned and operated by the Canadian Pacific."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 4--The Prairie Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.

Keys to History:

The Hotel Saskatchewan was built in Regina in 1927-28. It was one of a chain of hotels constructed and owned by the Canadian Pacific Railway. The railway's earlier hotels, notably the Chateau Frontenac in Quebec City and the Chateau Laurier in Ottawa, were designed in a distinctive chateau style, but by the late 1920s this was abandoned in favour of a much simpler and less expensive style. The Hotel Saskatchewan was the hub of the city's social life, and as part of the Radisson chain, is still a luxury hotel.

What:

The Hotel Saskatchewan was the hub of the social and business life of Saskatchewan's capital city.

Where:

The hotel, an imposing brick structure that reflects the pride and optimism of the era in which it was built, is in downtown Regina, Saskatchewan.

When:

The Hotel Saskatchewan opened in 1928.

Who:

The hotel was built by the Canadian Pacific Railway and is now a part of the Radisson chain.

MP-0000.158.69
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Medicine Hat, AB, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.69
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Medicine Hat: The next important stop is Medicine Hat, near the eastern boundary of Alberta. This city (population 10,000) is world-famous for its natural gas, which rushes up from the bowels of the earth at enormous speed and affords one of the cheapest illuminants and power sources that can be imagined. There are twenty-three gas wells at Medicine Hat, with approximately daily open flow of 50,000,000 cubic feet, equal to 200,000 horse-power. A number of manufacturing plants have been established here, to take advantage of this extraordinarily cheap fuel, which is used for lighting, heating and power."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 4--The Prairie Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.70
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Ogilvie flour mill, Medicine Hat, AB, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.70
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Flour Mill: Within the last few years, with the growth of the agricultural industry, a large number of flour mills have been established in Western Canada. They have a total output of over 128,000 barrels a day, and the establishments range in size from those of a capacity of only a few barrels to giant plants with capacities of a thousand and more barrels a day."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 4--The Prairie Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.71
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Bassano dam, near Calgary, AB, about 1925
W. J. Oliver
About 1920, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.71
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Bassano Dam: East of the city of Calgary for a distance of about 140 miles along the railway extends the great Canadian Pacific Irrigation Block, with an average width of about 30 miles. This is one of the largest individual irrigation projects on the American continent. The block consists of over 3,000,000 acres, of which a great portion has been brought under irrigation. Water is obtained from the Bow River at two inlets -- one at Calgary and the other at Bassano, eighty miles to the east. This picture shows the huge dam which has been erected on the Bow River near Bassano. This dam raises the level of the river by about 50 feet; the water, being raised, is carried in the main canal, seen at the right-hand side, and later distributed through a wonderful system of secondary canals and distributing ditches about 2,500 miles in length, over about 1,800 square miles of fertile prairie country, irrigating approximately one-third of that amount."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 4--The Prairie Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.72
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Irrigating potatoes, Western Canada, about 1925
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.72
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Irrigating Potatoes: This view shows the final stage in irrigation. The water that is diverted by the Bassano Dam, after flowing through main and secondary canal, eventually reaches the farmer's individual ditch that runs alongside his field. When he wishes to apply the water to his land, he plows several series of furrows, or if the crop is already above ground, re-uses the old furrows he plowed in the spring, places a small dam across the ditch, and runs out the water in the manner shown."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 4--The Prairie Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.73
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
The Prince of Wales' ranch, near High River, AB, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.73
© McCord Museum

Description:

"The Prince of Wales' Ranch: Western Canada's most famous and most popular farmer is probably the Prince of Wales, for His Royal Highness the Heir-Apparent of the British Throne owns a beautiful ranch near High River, Alberta, which he has visited on several occasions. It is well stocked with pure-bred cattle, and is an object-lesson in good, scientific farming."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 4--The Prairie Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.74
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
A Western Canadian farm, Regina, Sk., about 1923
H. W. Williams
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.74
© McCord Museum

Description:

"A Western Canadian Farm: The Canadian Pacific Railway is the owner of large tracts of agricultural land in the Prairie Provinces, the remainder of the land grant which it received as part of its construction subsidy. Ever since 1881 the Company has been settling these lands with desirable farmers. Especially within the last decade has it devoted much attention to this activity, taking as its leading principle the contention that land should be sold only to genuine farmers, who would reside upon it and develop it, and not to speculators. The price is very cheap for both un-irrigated and irrigated land. Terms of payment are very generous, being spread over a period of thirty-five years."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 4--The Prairie Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.75
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Chemistry building, University of Saskatoon, SK, about 1927
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1927, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.75
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Saskatoon: Saskatoon, on the South Saskatchewan River, is a little more than half-way between Winnipeg and Edmonton on the important branch line of the Canadian Pacific that connects those three cities. It is situated in the heart of a very rich agricultural district, for which it is the supply centre. Its growth has been very rapid, condensing into a shorter span of years than is even usually the case the characteristic development of the Western city. Less than twenty years ago Saskatoon was a tent settlement of a few score people; now it is a busy little metropolis of some 31,000.This is a view of the University of Saskatoon. In the foreground is seen the new Chemistry building with the Physics building to the right."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 4--The Prairie Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.76
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Hebridean settlers in Western Canada, about 1925
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.76
© McCord Museum

Description:

"New Settlers Arriving: The growth of Western Canada has been accomplished almost entirely by immigration. The natural increase of population would not people its millions of fertile acres within a couple of hundred years at least, and therefore Western Canada is peculiarly dependent upon immigration as its chief development factor. What immigration has accomplished in the past, and what opportunities are still open, are indicated by the following figures. At the census of 1901, the provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta had a population of 420,000. In the year 1926 the population had grown to 2,141,000. Reference has already been made (No. 60) to the fact that there are at least 167,000,000 acres of first-class arable land in these provinces. In 1925 less than 36,000,000 acres were actually under cultivation."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 4--The Prairie Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.77
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
C. P. R. Supply Farm No. 1, Strathmore, AB, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.77
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Strathmore -- Supply Farm: Strathmore is the headquarters of the Western section of the Canadian Pacific irrigation system. It has a large supply farm operated by the Canadian Pacific, which supplies, from its own production and by purchase from surrounding farmers, the Western dining car system and hotels of the Company with cream, butter, eggs, poultry, vegetables and other commodities."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 4--The Prairie Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.78
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Centre Street bridge, Calgary, AB, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.78
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Calgary: At Calgary, thirty miles further, we reach the end of the praries proper, and are at the foothills which climb gradually up to the Rockies. Calgary is the largest city between Winnipeg and Vancouver (population 78,000). Situated on the Bow River, it is a flourishing industrial and agricultural centre, the junction point of the main line of the Canadian Pacific with lines running north to Edmonton and south to Lethbridge and the headquarters of the Company`s Department of Natural Resources, which administers all the Canadian Pacific land, mineral and timber interests in the West. It has also, in the Ogden shops, the extensive Western machine shops of the Company."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 4--The Prairie Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.79
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
The Palliser Hotel, Calgary, AB, about 1919
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1919, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.79
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Calgary -- Palliser Hotel: The most imposing building in Calgary is the Palliser Hotel, operated by the Canadian Pacific. This handsome structure comprises ten floors. It is built in "E" shape, thereby making every room an outside room. From the roof garden one can obtain a beautiful view of the Rockies, over 50 miles away."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 4--The Prairie Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.80
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Parliament building, Edmonton, AB, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.80
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Edmonton: Capital of Alberta and centre of a very rich mixed farming area, centre of a large coal field, and an important wholesale centre. The important Peace River and Grande PraIries districts further north, also attaining rapid development, are tributary to Edmonton. Edmonton is the seat of the University of Alberta. The city is picturesquely situated on high ground overlooking the deep valley of the North Saskatchewan River. The Canadian Pacific enters by a magnificent high-level bridge, 2,687 feet in length and 150 feet above the water-level, which also carries street railway and vehicular traffic. The handsome Parliament Buildings are seen in the present picture. (Population 66,000.)"

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 4--The Prairie Provinces; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.81
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Locomotive #5903 at the entrance to the Rockies, AB, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.81
© McCord Museum

Description:

"The Gap: Between Winnipeg and Calgary the line has already climbed over 2,600 feet; and from Calgary to Banff it must climb another 1,100 feet in eighty miles. Leaving Calgary, the great stretches of level country cease, and the rolling grassy foothils succeed, rising tier upon tier to the base of the great ranges of which they are the outposts. Soon the mountains rise abruptly in great masses. A bend in the line brings the train between almost vertical walls of dizzy height, streaked and capped with snow and ice, and we enter the mountains by means of this gap. Through this gateway, also, the Bow River issues from the hills."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.82
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
The Three Sisters, Canmore, AB, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.82
© McCord Museum

Description:

"The Three Sisters: Canmore, a large coal-mining town, is passed in another five miles. Here is obtained a striking profile of the "Three Sisters," companion peaks that form one of the first notable sights of this journey. The highest peak is 9,734 feet high."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.83
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Cascade Mountain and Banff village, AB, about 1920
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1920, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.83
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Cascade Mountain: Cascade Mountain is seen for a long distance before it is actually reached. It is a large, bare rock, 9,826 feet in height, that dominates the northern end of the valley in which lies the village of Banff, which is here seen at the foot of the mountain."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.84
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Banff Springs Hotel, AB, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1920, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.84
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Banff: There are several Dominion Government reservations in Western Canada, of which Rocky Mountains Park, a wonderful region of 2,751 square miles, embracing rivers, lakes and noble mountain ranges, is the largest. Banff (altitude 4,537 feet) is its headquarters. No part of the Rockies exhibits a greater variety of sublime and pleasing scenery, and nowhere are good points of view and features of special interest so accesible as in this district, where so many good roads and bridle paths have been constructed. This picture shows the valley of the Bow River, with some of the surrounding mountains; in the centre is the Banff Springs Hotel, the magnificent hostelry built by the Canadian Pacific Railway, one of the most famous hotels of the entire world. Among the recreations of Banff are golf, tennis, driving, motoring, swimming, fishing, and mountain climbing."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.85
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Swimming pool, Banff Springs Hotel, AB, about 1935
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1935, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.85
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Banff - Swimming Pool: There are several hot sulphur springs at Banff, possessing high curative value and also forming excellent swimming pools. One of these pools is at the Banff Springs Hotel, just below the main terrace. It is supplied with sulphur water piped from Sulphur Mountain, and is seen in the centre of the picture."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.86
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Canoeing, Echo River, Banff, AB, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.86
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Banff - Canoeing: In the Rocky Mountains, where swift running waters generally preclude boating and canoeing, Banff is an exception. Lake Minnewanka, Vermilion Creek, Vermilion Lakes, and the Echo River, shown in the picture, offer beautiful trips by either motor-boat, row-boat, or canoes."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.87
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Buffalo, Banff, AB, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.87
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Banff - Buffalo: About 1½ miles to the other side of the village is an enclosed park containing a number of specimens of native wild animals, such as buffalo, elk, moose, mountain sheep and mountain goat. Here is seen part of the buffalo herd - one of the few remaining of what was, fifty years ago, the predominating animal of Western Canada, which roamed the prairies by millions."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.88
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Mountain sheep at Banff, AB, about 1932
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1932, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.88
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Banff - Mountain Sheep: Rocky Mountains Park, of which Banff is the centre, is a huge game reserve, in which the wild animals roam free and unharmed. Here are seen mountain sheep, wandering unmolested along the side of a popular mountain road."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.89
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
"Indian Days" event at Banff, AB, about 1925
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.89
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Indians at Banff: There are a number of Stoney Indians in the Morley Reservation near Banff, and the annual "Indian Day," consisting of sports, races, etc., held during July, has become one of the most eagerly anticipated events. The picture shows a party of Indians in the courtyard of the Banff Springs Hotel."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.

Keys to History:

By the 1920s, First Nations people on the Prairies had signed the treaties and moved to the reserves, and their children were in the residential schools run by the churches for the government, where many suffered illness and abuse. Now that the government seemed to have settled the "Indian question" , First Nations people could be appreciated for their "colourful" traditions-at least, those that had been approved by the authorities. "Indian Days" at the Banff Springs Hotel was fun for the tourists, who enjoyed the Native clothing and felt a thrill when the mounted "warriors" galloped and whooped. It was a chance for Aboriginal performers to earn some money, and no one saw any harm in it. Forty years earlier, during the Rebellion of 1885, settlers had been terrified of their fathers; now, these Native people were a tourist attraction.

What:

This is a photograph of an "Indian Days" celebration, an occasion by which tourists could admire Native clothing and mounted "warriors" up close.

Where:

The photograph was taken in front of the Banff Springs Hotel, Banff, Alberta.

When:

By 1925, when this picture was taken, the First Nations of the region participated in such events mostly as paid performers, for the benefit of tourists.

Who:

The participants are not identified; perhaps they are members of the Blackfoot First Nation.

MP-0000.158.90
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Radium Hot Springs bungalow camp, Kootenay National Park, BC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.90
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Castle Mountain Camp: The new automobile road from Banff to Lake Windermere, which lies between the Rockies and the Selkirks, has opened up to a magnificent Alpine country known hitherto only to the trapper and hunter. The route is over the Vermilion Pass, through a hundred miles of mountain range, forest and canyon, threading Kootenay National Park and reaching Lake Windermere, one of the loveliest warm water lakes in British Columbia. The road affords one of the most spectacular rides in North America, and is now travelled daily by motor coaches. At Castle Mountain, Vermilion River, Radium Hot Springs and Lake Windermere bungalow camps have been erected by the Canadian Pacific with comfortable accommodation for motor tourists.91. Radium Hot Springs Camp: Radium Hot Springs Camp is situated on the famous Banff - Windermere highway, on the border of the Kootenay National park (area 587 sq. miles). The radio-active waters of the Springs here long ago used to draw Indians from the mountains to bathe in their healing flow."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.91
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Sinclair Canyon, BC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.91
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Radium Hot Springs Camp: Radium Hot Springs Camp is situated on the famous Banff-Windermere Highway, on the border of the Kootenay National Park (area 587 sq. miles). The radio-active waters of the Springs here long ago used to draw Indians from the mountains to bathe in their healing flow."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.92
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Mount Assiniboine, AB, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.92
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Sinclair Canyon: The Banff-Windermere motor road takes the traveller into the heart of some remarkable scenery, of which Sinclair Canyon, just outside the boundaries of Kootenay Park, is a typical example. At Lake Windermere the road links up with the roads leading to the United States, forming a wonderful "Grand Circle" tour."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.93
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Trail Riders in the Canadian Rockies, about 1925
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.93
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Mount Assiniboine: Twenty miles south of Banff is Mount Assiniboine (height 11,860 feet), the Matterhorn of the New World, the first ascent of which was made, after many unsuccessful attempts, in 1901. The way thither leads through beautiful valleys shaded with transparent blue lakes and park-like openings, and the journey is a particularly fine pony and camping trip, with a camp at the end."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.94
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Skyline Trail Hikers, Canadian Rockies, about 1935
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1935, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.94
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Trail Riders: Every year the Trail Riders of the Canadian Rockies gather at some spot near either Lake Louise or Banff for their annual "pow-wow" and ride. In addition, circle trail rides are conducted weekly during the season, under the auspices of the Trail Riders. There are 700 miles of good trails in Rocky Mountains Park alone."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.95
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Lake Louise, AB, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.95
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Lake Louise: Thirty-five miles from Banff we reach Lake Louise. The station here is at an altitude of 5,050 feet, but to reach the lake we must ascend another 630 feet, which we do by means of a light gasoline railway. Turning a shoulder of the mountains, we come suddenly into full view of far-famed Lake Louise, one of the most perfect gems of scenery in the world. It is, says one writer, "a lake of the deepest and most exquisite coloring, ever changing, defying analysis, mirroring in its wonderful depths the forests and cliffs that rise from its shores on either side, the gleamimg white glacier, the tremendous snow-crowned peaks that fill the background of the picture, and the blue sky and fleecy clouds overhead."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.96
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Chateau Lake Louise, AB, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.96
© McCord Museum

Description:

Chateau Lake Louise: On the shore of the lake is a magnificent hotel (open during the summer months), operated by the Canadian Pacific Railway. Some there are who are satisfied to sit on the verandah watching the marvellous kaleidoscope of colors, while others are eager to be out on the trail, either on foot or on the back of sure-footed mountain ponies. Along the western shore of the lake is a delightful mile walk along a level trail, with splendid views of Mount Lefroy and Mount Victoria."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.97
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Swimming pool, Chateau Lake Louise, AB, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.97
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Lake Louise -- Swimming Pool: A beautiful open-air swimming pool adjoins the Chateau. The pool is of concrete. The glacial waters with which it is filled are heated to a comfortable temperature."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.98
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Lakes in the Clouds, near Lake Louise, AB, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.98
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Lakes in the Clouds: An easy walk, or delightful pony ride, is that to the Lakes in the Clouds. Leaving the west end of the hotel, an excellent trail rises 1,000 feet to Mirror Lake, and thence, rather more steeply, another 225 feet past the Bridal Veil Falls to Lake Agnes. These lakes, situated among scenes of the wildest beauty, lie like jewels on the bosom of the mountains, and their calm, placid surfaces breathe peace and quietness. Both lakes are seen in this picture, and also, from left right, Mount Aberdeen (10,340 feet), Mount Lefroy (11,220 feet), the Beehive (7,430 feet) and Victoria (11,355 feet)."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.99
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Plain of the Six Glaciers, near Lake Louise, AB, about 1925
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.99
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Plain of Six Glaciers: The Plain of Six Glaciers lies four miles by a good trail from Lake Louise. The approach to the broad, gleaming expanse of glacial ice is through fragrant, green woods. Above the Plain tower Mts. Lefroy and Mitre."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.100
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Moraine Lake, AB, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.100
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Moraine Lake: Moraine Lake is reached from Lake Louise by automobile or pony. It is a lovely mountain lake lying in the "Valley of the Ten Peaks." These ten peaks, all of which are over 10,000 feet high, and the highest of which, Mount Deltaform, is 11,225 feet, encircle the eastern and southern sides of the lake, and present a serrated profile that makes a most majestic view. Only seven of these are visible in the picture."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.101
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Bungalow camp, Moraine Lake, AB, about 1925
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.101
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Moraine Lake Camp: On the shore of Moraine Lake is situated a charming little bungalow camp that affords very convenient headquarters. Lake Consolation, near Moraine Lake, has good trout fishing."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.102
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Paradise Valley, near Lake Louise, AB, about 1925
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.102
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Paradise Valley: Another very beautiful spot within easy acces of Lake Louise is Paradise Valley, which lies on the other side of the mountains that rise on the eastern side of the lake. This picture is taken looking down into Paradise Valley from near the Saddleback tea-house, which is a very delightful pony ride from Lake Louise."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.103
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
The Great Divide, AB-BC, about 1925
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.103
© McCord Museum

Description:

The Great Divide: Six miles west of Lake Louise is the "Great Divide" -- which is at once the highest elevation of the Canadian Pacific Railway (5,326 feet), the boundary between Alberta and British Columbia, and the very backbone of the continent. It is markes by an arch spanning a stream, under which the water divides, by one of those freaks by which Nature diverts herself, into two little brooks that have vastly different fates. The waters that flow to the east eventually reach Hudson Bay and the Atlantic Ocean; the rivulet that runs to the west adds its mite to the volume of the Pacific."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.104
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Wapta bungalow camp seen from across lake, Rocky Mountains, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.104
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Wapta Camp: At various points throughout the Rocky Mountains the Canadian Pacific Railway has erected a series of bungalow camps. These camps, which are eight in number, consists of artistically constructed sleeping bungalows surrounding a central community house used for dining and recreational purposes, and have attained a remarkable popularity amongst hikers, climbers and trail-tourists who wish to get off the beaten track. The picture shows Wapta Camp, just west of the Great Divide."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.105
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Lake O'Hara Lodge, Yoho National Park, BC, about 1927
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1927, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.105
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Lake O'Hara Bungalow Camp: Lake O'Hara Bungalow camp is situated on the shore of one of the most exquisite of the many lakes in the Canadian Rockies, and is reached by an eight-mile trail ride south from Wapta. The Camp consists of a main building of Swiss architecture and little log cabins spread along the shore of the lake."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.106
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Lake O'Hara, Yoho National Park, BC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.106
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Lake O'Hara: Lake O'Hara is set like a jewel among the towering peaks which surround it. Its color is never constant, but changes opal-like to the touch of the wind and the shadow of clouds. There are but two ways to get to Lake O'Hara, afoot or astride a mountain-pony. No one who has made the trip has ever said the effort was not more than repaid."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.107
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Lake McArthur, Canadian Rockies, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.107
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Lake McArthur: The trail from Lake O'Hara runs upward to Lake McArthur, 7,359 feet above sea-level. Its waters are of a perfect, almost indescribable blue. There is a glacier here, and huge chunks of ice may be seen, even on a hot summer's day, floating in the clear waters."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.108
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Cathedral Mountain, near Field, BC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.108
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Cathedral Mountain: From the Great Divide the railway begins to descend. Between here and Field, a distance of fourteen miles, it descends, in fact, nearly a quarter of a mile through the Kicking Horse Pass. Formerly this was a difficult track, the gradient being 4.5 per cent; but by two wonderful tunnels -- forming one of the most notable engineering feats in existence -- this difficulty has now been eliminated, and the grade reduced to 2.2 per cent. These tunnels are the famous "Spiral Tunnels." From the east the track enters the first tunnel, 3,255 feet in length, and after turning a complete circle and passing under itself, emerges into daylight 54 feet lower. (Mount Cathedral 10,454 feet high.)"

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.109
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
The Spiral Tunnels, Field, BC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.109
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Spiral Tunnels: The track then turns easterly, and crossing the river enters the second tunnel, 2,292 feet long, under Mount Ogden. Again turning a complete circle and passing under itself, it comes out 50 feet lower and continues westward to Field. The whole thing is a perfect maze, the railway doubling back upon itself twice and forming a rough figure 8 in shape. This picture shows all three tracks, with the old discarded one in the centre. A train is making its way up the hill on the lowest track, and will shortly enter the tunnel under Mount Ogden (height 8,795 feet), seen at the left."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.110
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Riding out to Yoho Valley, BC, about 1925
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.110
© McCord Museum

Description:

"The Yoho Valley: The beautiful Yoho Valley, one of the chief attractions of Yoho National Park, can be reached by several routes -- either by road from Wapta Camp, by motor road from Field, or by trail from Emerald Lake (see No. 115). Here we are looking at it from its southern entrance, near the junction of the Yoho River with the Kicking Horse River and close to Wapta Camp we shall visit its camp."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.111
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Bungalow camp, Yoho Valley, BC, about 1925
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.111
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Yoho Valley Camp: A beautiful 11-mile drive or ride from Field brings us to Yoho Valley Camp, another of the bungalow camps to which reference has already been made. The camp is situated near Takakkaw Falls. A very fine trail ride over the Yoho Pass, past Summit Lake (with a little tea-house) to Emerald Lake. (See No. 115.)"

(Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.112
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Takakkaw Falls, Yoho Valley, BC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.112
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Takakkaw Falls: The spectacular Takakkaw Falls, a short distance from Yoho Valley Bungalow Camp, are 1,200 feet high, forming one high ribbon of water descending from precipitous cliffs in clouds of foam."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.113
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Twin Falls, Yoho Valley, BC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.113
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Twin Falls: Further up the Yoho Valley, following the Yoho River, is a rather more rugged country affording a longer trip. The Twin Falls are of great interest, owing to the perpendicular drop of the two vast columns of water and the dense clouds of steamlike spray caused by their concussion with the rock floor beneath. From here one can penetrate still further into the range and reach the Yoho Glacier. A tea-house has been established, providing overnight accomodation at Twin Falls."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.114
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Mountain climbing, Canadian Rockies, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.114
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Mountain Climbing: An active Alpine Club, with 500 members and headquarters at Banff, holds a camp each year in the Canadian Rockies, and welcomes those who have the ambition to climb a peak at least 10,000 feet high. There is plenty of choice, for, according to a list recently completed from Government measurements, there are 144 peaks over 10,000 feet, of which 41 are over 11,000 feet. The Canadian Pacific has a number of experienced Swiss guides attached to its mountain hotels. These guides were originally imported from Europe, but now have a picturesque little colony of their own near Golden, B.C."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.115
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Emerald Lake, Field, BC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.115
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Emerald Lake: Instead, however, of returning by road, one can descend from the summit of the Yoho Pass to Emerald Lake, a lovely little gem of green water nestling in the forest and completely surrounded by lofty peaks, whose green-ribboned glaciers can be seen protruding from the rocky cirques of the upper slope. Mount Burgess dominates this beautiful lake."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.116
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Chalet hotel, Emerald Lake, BC, about 1925
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.116
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Emerald Lake Chalet: At Emerald Lake a charming chalet hotel, operated by the Canadian Pacific, affords accommodation for tourists. Emerald Lake can also be reached direct from Field by a good carriage road, seven miles in distance."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.117
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Summit Lake and Mount Wapta, BC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.117
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Summit Lake: Summit Lake lies along the pass by which the Yoho Valley is reached from Emerald Lake. It is a green little lake, smaller than Emerald, and lies embowered in the cool green forest. The great crags of Mount Wapta tower above it. Gazing down, the visitor can see far below the flashing waters of Emerald Lake."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MISSING.158.118
© McCord Museum
Photo not available
MISSING.158.118
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Near Field, B.C.: After passing Field the railway runs down the Kicking Horse Valley between the Ottertail and Van Horne Ranges. The picture shows a train speeding to the Pacific, with Leanchoil Mountains being left rapidly behind."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.119
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
The Kicking Horse Trail, from Golden to Field, BC, about 1925
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.119
© McCord Museum

Description:

"The Kicking Horse Trail: New motor roads are constantly being built in the Canadian Rockies. One of the latest to be opened is the Kicking Horse Trail, from Field to Golden, a picturesque and spectacular drive along the narrow, deep valley of the Kicking Horse River."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.120
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Connaught Tunnel, Glacier, BC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.120
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Connaught Tunnel, Glacier: From Golden we rise, following the Columbia River, to Glacier at the Summit of the Selkirk Range. Formerly the railway crossed the Selkirks by the Rogers Pass; but now it utilizes the Connaught Tunnel, opened to traffic in December, 1916. This wonderful tunnel is one of the longest railway tunnels in America, and is five miles long. It pierces Mount Macdonald, and not only lowers the summit attained by the railroad by 552 feet, but also eliminates track curvature to an amount corresponding to seven complete circles. Mount Macdonald (9,482 feet) is seen in this picture."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.121
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Mount Sir Donald, Glacier, BC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.121
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Mount Sir Donald: At Glacier, Mount Sir Donald lifts its tremendous bulk against the sky. This naked and abrupt monolith, named after Sir Donald Smith (later Lord Strathcona), is 10,808 feet in height. Lord Strathcona was one of the group who were directly responsible for the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway, 1881-1885."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.122
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Illecillewaet Valley, Glacier, BC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.122
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Illecillewaet Valley: From Glacier we descend the western slopes of the Selkirk Range and henceforth our course -- with the exception of one or two minor ranges to climb -- is uniformly downwards towards the Pacific. The scenery still continues magnificently impressive; as witness this picture of the Illecillewaet Valley through which flows the river of the same name."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.123
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Albert Canyon, near Revelstoke, BC, about 1915
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1915, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.123
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Albert Canyon: A few miles west, a stop is made for travellers to view the Albert Canyon, a deep fissure in the solid rock, whose walls rise straight up on both sides to wooded crags. The railway runs along the very edge of this gorge. The river is seen nearly 150 feet below, compressed into a boiling flume scarcely 20 feet wide."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.124
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Revelstoke, BC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.124
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Revelstoke, B.C.: The city of Revelstoke is situated on the Columbia River, and is the gateway to the West Kootenay mining camps. This view shows the town as it appears from Mt. Revelstoke and Mount Begbie."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.125
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Donald Smith, later Lord Strathcona, driving the last spike, C. P. R., Craigellachie, BC, 1885 (copied about 1928)
Alexander Ross
1885, 19th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.125
© McCord Museum

Description:

"The Last Spike. Thirty miles beyond Revelstoke, at Craigellachie, an obelisk alongside the track commemorates the completion of the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway. It was here on November 7th, 1885, that the rails from the East met the rails from the West, and the long-cherished vision of a Canadian trans-continental railway became a reality. In this photograph of that historic day, three builders of Canada are seen--Sir Donald Smith (later Lord Strathcona) who is driving a golden spike, Mr. (later Sir) Sandford Fleming who stands immediately behind him, and Mr. (later Sir) William Van Horne to the left. From Craigellachie, in an hour we reach Sicamous, where for a time we will rest."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 5--The Canadian Rockies; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.

Keys to History:

This hand-coloured version of perhaps the most famous photograph ever taken in Canada was shot by Alexander Ross, and was one of several taken on November 7, 1885 at Craigellachie, near Revelstoke, B.C. It shows Donald Smith (later created Lord Strathcona) driving the last spike on the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR). Canada, a country less than twenty years old, was now tied by rail from sea to sea, largely through the efforts of Scottish entrepreneurs. The completion of the "national dream" on that day has at least three Scottish connections: Smith (1820-1914) was born in Scotland, as was Sandford Fleming, CPR director and former chief engineer of the CPR project for the government. He is the tall bearded man in the top hat standing behind Smith. Craigellachie was named for a place in Morayshire, Scotland, near where Smith grew up.

What:

The honour of driving the last spike was assigned to Donald Smith, the eldest of the four directors of the CPR present. His first blow did not land well and he bent the spike badly. It was quickly pulled out and replaced with another.

Where:

The photograph was taken at Craigellachie, near Revelstoke, B.C., where a cairn now marks the event.

When:

The last spike was driven on November 7, 1885, fourteen years after British Columbia demanded, as a condition for its entry into the Canadian Confederation, the commencement of a transcontinental railway within two years and its completion within ten years.

Who:

To the right side of the track, the man with hand on hip looking at the photographer is James Ross (another Scot). In 1882 he was appointed manager of construction for the mountain section of the Canadian Pacific Railway.

MP-0000.158.126
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Galt Coal mine, Canadian Pacific Railway, Lethbridge, AB, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.126
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Coal Mining: Instead of following the main line to Vancouver, we can use an alternative route a hundred or more miles south. Retracing our steps to Calgary, we will swing south to the prosperous little city of Lethbridge, and then turn west. This route is through the Crow's Nest Pass, the lake region of southern British Columbia, and the Kettle Valley. It opens up a country of diverse interest -- beautiful lakes, impressive mountain ranges, fruit farming, and coal and metal mining. The picture shows one of the Galt Mines at Lethbridge, owned by the Canadian Pacific."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 6--Southern British Columbia; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.

Keys to History:

Out West, the arrival of the Canadian Pacific Railway gave a boost to mining. Rich deposits of coal, discovered earlier in southern Alberta, became attractive once it was possible to sell to eastern markets. One of the biggest mining towns in the West was undoubtedly Lethbridge, which was soon linked to Canadian Pacific's mainline. At first mining was done traditionally, as at the Eustis mine, that is, by digging horizontal tunnels into hillsides-thus keeping the work required to get the ore out to a minimum. But the progressively greater distance that had to be travelled to reach the mine face within the deposit forced companies to dig vertical shafts marked by headframes, starting in the 1890s.

What:

The headframe and mill at the Galt mine stayed in the family until 1912, when they were bought out by Canadian Pacific.

Where:

Processing and sorting of coal, usually done by young, inexperienced workers, took place in the mill beside the headframe.

When:

In 1919, a few years before this picture was taken, 20,000 miners lived in Lethbridge, making it one of the biggest mining towns in Canada.

Who:

Although deposits were frequently discovered by penniless prospectors who were then obliged to sell their rights to rich entrepreneurs, the Galt mine was opened by Elliot T. Galt, son of Sir Alexander T. Galt, a wealthy Montreal businessman who turned a profit from his discovery.

MP-0000.158.127
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Crow's Nest Mountain, AB-BC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.127
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Crow's Nest Mountain. The route we follow is through rugged and impressive scenery. Crow's Nest Mountain, a circular monolith with its base deeply tinted in purple and green, and crowned and capped in a dazzling mass of snow and ice, is seen for many miles. Dominating the whole district, it stands at the border line of British Columbia and Alberta, and is 9,138 feet high. A variety of causes is ascribed for the name of this mountain, but the one most likely is that this was the scene of an historic massacre of Crow Indians by another tribe."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 6--Southern British Columbia; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.128
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Lake Windermere Bungalow Camp, Columbia River valley, BC, about 1925
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.128
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Lake Windermere Bungalow Camp: The far-famed Columbia River takes its rise from the north end of Lake Windermere, in the Columbia Valley. The lake is ten miles long, with considerable settlement at the northern end. The tourist will find fine air, beautiful surroundings, and the very best riding, driving, boating and sailing. Within easy automoblie reach are two well-known hot springs. An attractive bungalow cabin camp has now been established along the shores of Lake Windermere, and affords accommodation for the visitor.A memorial to David Thompson, the explorer, who reached this district in 1807-8 and who descended the Columbia River to its mouth, has been erected near Lake Windermere by the Canadian Pacific Railway. This memorial takes the form of a replica of the stockaded fort which Thompson built."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 6--Southern British Columbia; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MISSING.158.129
© McCord Museum
Photo not available
MISSING.158.129
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Nelson: Resuming the trip through the Crow's Nest Pass, we arrive, after a stop at the city of Cranbrook, at the southern end of Kootenay Lake. A steamer takes us from here up the lake to Nelson. This bright little city, charmingly situated on the west arm of the lake, is the commercial centre of the Kootenay Lake district and of the whole Boundary mining district. Immediately behind it is the mountain in which is located the famous "Silver King" mine, from which over ten million dollars of treasure have been taken."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 6--Southern British Columbia; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MISSING.158.130
© McCord Museum
Photo not available
MISSING.158.130
© McCord Museum

Description:

<>"Kaslo: Kootenay Lake affords within a comparatively small area a great variety of lake and mountain scenery. Deep canyons, high peaks, glaciers, and leaping waterfalls, carefully tended orchards surrounded by snow-capped timbercovered mountains, the whole mirrored in the lake - this district is altogether a beautiful one. At the central point of the northern part of the lake, four hours' steamer journey from Nelson, is Kaslo, a pretty little town facing the great bulk of the almost unexplored Purcell Range."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 2--The Province of Quebec; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.131
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
On the Arrow Lakes, Columbia River, BC, about 1925
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.131
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Arrow Lakes: On the other side of the Selkirk range are the Arrow Lakes, formed by the broadening of the Columbia River on its way south. These beautiful lakes, tributary to which is a great lumbering region, are practically two, connected by a circuitous channel, and are about 130 miles long. Midway between Kootenay Lake and the Arrow Lakes is yet another, perched gemlike at a considerable altitude -- Slocan Lake, in the heart of a very active mining district. The Arrow Lakes are traversed by a popular Canadian Pacific steamer line, which runs from Robson West, twenty-seven miles west of Nelson, to Arrowhead at the north, whence a short rail journey brings the traveller to Revelstoke on the main line."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 6--Southern British Columbia; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.132
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Trail, BC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.132
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Trail Smelter: From Nelson the railway, after passing the south end of the Arrow Lakes, enters the far-famed "Rossland Boundary District," one of the richest mining sections of Canada, a large number of famous camps being here, such as Trail, Rossland, grand Forks, Phoenix, etc. The Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company's smelter at Trail is the largest in Canada, and treats gold, silver, lead, zinc and copper ores, and turns out these metals in a refined state ready for the market."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 6--Southern British Columbia; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.133
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Quintette Tunnels, near Penticton, BC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.133
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Quintette Tunnels: Leaving Penticton, the railway climbs up into Cascade range through rugged scenery of a noble character, and , following the Coquihalla River, joins the main line of the Canadian Pacific at Petain. A most impressive engineering feat is the "Quintette Tunnels" -- five tunnels in such perfect alignment that a view is obtained through all of them at once. At the portal of each, the walls rise sheer for hundreds of feet, while the gap to the next tunnel is bridged by a steel span. Underneath, the Coquihalla River, a raging torrent, zigzags its way between them."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 6--Southern British Columbia; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MISSING.158.134
© McCord Museum
Photo not available
MISSING.158.134
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Okanagan Lake: From Penticton the main line of the Canadian Pacific can also be reached by steamer to Okanagan Landing, and thence by rail to Sicamous. There are number of important towns in the valley, Kelowna, Vernon, Armstrong, etc."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 6--Southern British Columbia; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.135
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Sicamous Hotel and station, Sicamous, BC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.135
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Sicamous: We are now back at Sicamous, on the main line, where we halted on our across-Canada journey. (See No. 125.) Sicamous is not only the junction point for the Okanagan Valley; it is also a favorite stop-over point for travellers who, having traversed the mountains, wish also to see by daylight the wonderful canyon scenery that lies between here and Vancouver. To accommodate this traffic, the Canadian Pacific has erected a comfortable hotel. Sicamous stands on Lake Shuswap, a large body of water of irregular shape, which affords wonderful trout fishing."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 7--The Pacific Coast; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.136
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Thompson River Canyon, BC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.136
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Thompson River Canyon: For a while we follow the south fork of the Thompson River. At Kamloops, a busy town, The North Fork joins it, and thence the Thompson River becomes a large and important waterway. Passing through a rich agricutural district, famous for its potatoes, we enter the deep Thompson Canyon. The railway runs upon a ledge, cut out of the bare hills on the irregular south side of the river. The headquarters are penetrated by tunnels, and the ravines are spanned by lofty bridges."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 7--The Pacific Coast; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.137
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Hell's Gate, Fraser Canyon, BC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.137
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Fraser Canyon -- Hell Gates: At Lytton the canyon widens suddenly to admit the Fraser River, the chief river of British Columbia, which comes down from the north between two great lines of mountain peaks, and whose turbid flood soon absorbs the bright green waters of the Thompson. The scenery becomes wilder than ever. The great river is forced between vertical walls of black rock, where, repeatedly thrown back upon itself by opposing cliffs, it madly foams and roars. At "Hell Gates," near North Bend, the river is suddenly compressed by two jutting promontories, and through this bottle-neck has to escape in a roaring cataract."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 7--The Pacific Coast; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.138
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Four tunnels on the C. P. R., Fraser River Canyon, BC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.138
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Fraser Canyon -- Four Tunnels: The railway follows the canyon, at often a considerable height above the river bank, the track hewn from the solid rock, and not only crossing from side to side of the canyon, but also tunneling through great rock spurs. At Spuzzum, four tunnels are located in rapid succession, as seen in this picture. This section of the railway commands the admiration of all passengers for the way it has overcome apparently insuperable difficulties."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 7--The Pacific Coast; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.139
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Yale, BC, about 1923
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1923, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.139
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Yale: This view affords a comprehensive idea of the nature of the Fraser River Canyon. Yale occupies a bench above the river, in a deep cul-de-sac in the mountains, which rise abruptly and to a great height on all sides. It was formerly a gold-mining town and an important outfitting point for prospectors."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 7--The Pacific Coast; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.140
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Vancouver, BC, about 1920
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1920, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.140
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Vancouver: Vancouver, the Western terminus of the rail lines of the Canadian Pacific, is one of the leading cities of the North Pacific coast. It is a very important seaport, with a vast Oriental business, and the centre of a huge lumbering and fishing trade. It is also coming rapidly to the fore in shipbuilding. (Population including suburbs 255,000.)"

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 7--The Pacific Coast; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.141
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Hotel Vancouver, Vancouver, BC, about 1918
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1918, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.141
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Hotel Vancouver: At Vancouver is situated a palatial Canadian Pacific hotel, a magnificent structure. Until May, 1886, the site of Vancouver was a dense forest; then a flourishing town arose, to be wiped out by fire in July; all Vancouver -- which now includes not only the original settlement, but also extends in suburbs in every direction, even across the river -- dates from that disaster. The city, with its towering skyscrapers, has a very progressive aspect."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 7--The Pacific Coast; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.142
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
The Harding Monument, Stanley Park, Vancouver, BC, about 1926
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1926, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.142
© McCord Museum

Description:

"The Harding Monument: In Stanley park stands this monument to President Harding of the United States. It commemorates his visit to Vancouver on July 26, 1923, and bears testimony to the friendship which has existed without a break between the two countries for over a century. Stanley Park is a remarkable spot -- a large primeval forest right within the city's limits, containing trees of almost inconceivable age and size."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 7--The Pacific Coast; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.143
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Unloading salmon from scows, Westminster, BC, about 1920
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1920, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.143
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Salmon Fishing: The Fraser River is one the most famous salmon rivers of the world, and the salmon fisheries form one of the most profitable industries of the Pacific coast. The fish "run" up the Fraser River for a considerable distance, but the headquarters of the canning industry are at Westminster. Gigantic canneries, employing a large number of people, have an output of many thousands pounds a day, and B.C. salmon finds its way to practically all parts of the civilized world."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 7--The Pacific Coast; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.144
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Bathers at English Bay, Vancouver, BC, about 1925
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1925, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.144
© McCord Museum

Description:

"English Bay, Vancouver: There are numerous fine bathing beaches around Vancouver, the most easily reached of which are English Bay and Kitsilano, both on street-car lines. The scene at English Bay, which lies at one entrance to Stanley Park, on a sunny afternoon, is one of great animation. Burrard Inlet, English Bay and the North Arm are excellent places also for boating. Vancouver boasts of one of the finest yacht clubs on the Pacific coast."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 7--The Pacific Coast; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.145
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Canadian Pacific's "Princess Marguerite", B. C. Coastal Ship, about 1926
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1926, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.145
© McCord Museum

Description:

""Princess Marguerite": Four hours' sail across the Strait of Georgia brings one to Victoria and nine hours down Puget Sound is the big American city of Seattle. A fleet of fast Canadian Pacific steamers maintains a triangular service between these three cities; of this fleet the "Princess Marguerite" and "Princess Kathleen" -- the fastest ships in the North American coastwise business -- are the chief."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 7--The Pacific Coast; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.146
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Provincial Parliament Buildings, Victoria, BC, about 1922
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1922, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.146
© McCord Museum

Description:

Victoria: By the "Princess Marguerite," or one of its sister boats, we sail across the Strait of Georgia to Victoria, at the southern end of Vancouver Island. Victoria, the provincial capital of British Columbia, is a beautiful city that is often, because of the characteristic beauty of its residential district, called "A bit of England on the shores of the Pacific." The picture shows the harbor, at the back of which are seen the handsome provincial Parliament buildings, and at the left the Empress Hotel. Although largely a resort and residential city, Victoria has a flourishing business, being the centre for the lumbering, fishing and whaling industries of Vancouver Island. (Population 65,000.)"

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 7--The Pacific Coast; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MISSING.158.147
© McCord Museum
Photo not available
MISSING.158.147
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Victoria: Empress Hotel. At Victoria is the last in the chain of the Canadian Pacific hotels that stretch from coast to coast - the Empress. In this hotel is combined originality of design, a beautiful site, and a harmony of arrangement and appointment."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 7--The Pacific Coast; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.148
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
Crystal Gardens, Victoria, BC, about 1926
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1926, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.148
© McCord Museum

Description:

"Victoria -- Crystal Gardens: Adjoining the Empress Hotel, a new amusement garden has been opened under the name of "The Crystal Gardens." It contains one of the world`s largest salt-water swimming pools, as well as conservatories, convention and concert halls, a large pavilion for dancing, gymnasium, and facilities for other indoor amusements."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 7--The Pacific Coast; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.149
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
The Butchart Gardens, near Victoria, BC, about 1922
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1922, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.149
© McCord Museum

Description:

"The Butchart Gardens: A few miles from Victoria lie the famous Butchart Gardens, private property but open to public view. What was once an old quarry is now a beautiful pool rimmed round by vines and flowers of amazing variety and luxuriance. Near the house on the estate is an Italian Garden. Close by is a Japanese Garden."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 7--The Pacific Coast; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


MP-0000.158.150
© McCord Museum
Photograph, glass lantern slide
S.S. "Empress of Japan", Canadian Pacific Steamship Line, about 1935
Anonyme - Anonymous
About 1935, 20th century
Silver salts and transparent ink on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
8 x 10 cm
Gift of Mr. Stanley G. Triggs
MP-0000.158.150
© McCord Museum

Description:

"From Vancouver the Canadian Pacific maintains steamship services not only to Victoria and Seattle, but also to Alaska, the west coast of Vancouver Island, China, Japan and the Philippine Islands. The magnificent Empresses of the Pacific are the largest, finest and fastest to the Orient."

Excerpt from "ACROSS CANADA BY C. P. R.", Section 7--The Pacific Coast; booklet, McGill University Illustrated Lectures, 1928.


© Musée McCord Museum