Keywords:
 
 Include images of partners







Frederick George Scott fonds (P229)

1818-1963. - 300 cm of textual records. - 284 prints. - 47 snapshot negatives.

Administrative History - Biographical Sketch:

Frederick George Scott (1861-1944), a son of Dr. William E. Scott (professor of anatomy at McGill University) was a graduate of Bishop's University. Ordained in the Church of England in 1886, he became a canon of Holy Trinity Cathedral in 1906 and during the First World War was the senior chaplain of the Canadian First Division. His son, Henry Hutton Scott was killed during the war. He wrote several books of poetry and other literary works including his wartime reminiscences «The Great War As I Saw It» (1922). He was elected F.R.S.C. in 1900. In 1887, he married Amy Brooks and they had six children including William Bridges Scott born in 1888, a judge, and Francis Reginald Scott born in 1899, a McGill University professor, lawyer and poet.

(Source : Guide to Archival Resources at McGill University : Private Papers At McGill University. McGill University Archives. 1985. Vol.3, p.309)

Scope and Content:

The Frederick George Scott fonds concerns his activities as a clergyman, writer and poet and those of other members of the Scott family.

The fonds consists of correspondence, sermons, addresses, transcripts of radio talks, manuscript poems, manuscripts of "Four Years After," diaries and personal bills. Other materials include correspondence of other Scott family members such as William E. Scott, Henry Hutton Scott, William Bridges Scott and Francis Reginald Scott. The fonds is divided into the following series: correspondence, printed documents, thematic files, miscellaneous, diaries, music books, scrapbook.

Photographic material in the Notman Photographic Archives is composed of portraits and snapshots of F. G. Scott and his family. F. G. Scott's work during World War I constitutes a major part of the fonds and includes small snapshots of WWI trenches as well as damaged buildings and village streets in France.