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Adney, Edwin Tappan

Born in Ohio in 1868, Edwin Tappan Adney was an artist, journalist, photographer and ethnologist. He is perhaps best known for ensuring that the art of making birch bark canoes did not disappear, in part through a book that he wrote on this subject.

From 1897 to 1898, Adney worked in the Yukon as a photographer for the New York-based magazine Harper's Weekly. He was one of the first photojournalists to travel to the Klondike to cover the Gold Rush. After returning to New York in 1900, Adney published The Klondike Stampede, an illustrated book of his experiences in the Klondike. He then moved to Montreal where, among other jobs, he worked for the Museum of McGill University as a consultant on aboriginal lore. In 1899, he married Minnie Bell Sharp, the daughter of the celebrated horticulturalist Francis Peabody Sharp, and a well-known pianist and singer in her own right.

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Climbing Chilkoot Pass, Klondike Gold Rush, Alaska, 1898 (MP-1979.111.18)

Photograph
Climbing Chilkoot Pass, Klondike Gold Rush, Alaska, 1898
Edwin Tappan Adney
1898, 19th century
MP-1979.111.18

Nome Street and Steadman Avenue, Nome, Alaska, about 1900 (MP-1979.111.169)

Photograph
Nome Street and Steadman Avenue, Nome, Alaska, about 1900
Edwin Tappan Adney
About 1900, 19th century or 20th century
MP-1979.111.169

Rock face at water's edge, far end of Little Missinabie Lake, ON, 1930 (MP-0000.2141.19)

Photograph
Rock face at water's edge, far end of Little Missinabie Lake, ON, 1930
Edwin Tappan Adney
1930, 20th century
MP-0000.2141.19