X10724 | Moli Elizabet Francis, Mrs. John Alexander, Noel Francis, Makaw and Others at Tobique, New Brunswick

 
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Photograph
Moli Elizabet Francis, Mrs. John Alexander, Noel Francis, Makaw and Others at Tobique, New Brunswick
About 1904, 20th century
Silver print mounted on card
14.6 x 9.4 cm
X10724
This artefact belongs to: © New Brunswick Museum
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Keys to History

As New Brunswick navigated the bumpy road of "progress" at the turn of the 20th century, its Aboriginal peoples continued to struggle for survival. Since they were considered separate and much different from mainstream society, Aboriginal voices remained silent. For the most part, the Wolastoqiyik, Mi'kmaq and Passamaquoddy Aboriginal peoples of New Brunswick were excluded from jobs in the industrial economy. During this period they were also regularly denied entrance to restaurants, hotels and public places. One area where they were able to find gainful employment, however, was as nature guides for the tourists who came in search of adventure, hunting and fishing in New Brunswick's hinterland.

  • What

    By the early 1900s traditional Wolastoqiyik modes of dress and shelter had been overshadowed by European-style frame dwellings and clothing.

  • Where

    This photograph was taken where the Tobique River joins the St. John River, roughly 200 kilometres northwest of Fredericton, New Brunswick.

  • When

    The Tobique First Nation, a Wolastoqiyik community, was established in 1801.

  • Who

    The English translation of the name Wolastoqiyik is "People of the Beautiful River" or "People of the Good River."