VIEW-13422 | Handicraft show, Protestant Hospital for the Insane, Verdun, QC, 1913-14

 
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Photograph
Handicraft show, Protestant Hospital for the Insane, Verdun, QC, 1913-14
Wm. Notman & Son
1913-1914, 20th century
Silver salts on glass - Gelatin silver process
20 x 25 cm
Purchase from Associated Screen News Ltd.
VIEW-13422
© McCord Museum
Description
Keywords:  architecture (335) , building (34) , female (135) , figure (1849) , group (644) , gymnasium (2) , handicraft show (2) , interior (40) , leisure (134) , leisure event (98) , nurse (10) , Occupation (1110) , Photograph (77678) , Verdun (7) , Verdun Hospital (3)
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Keys to History

The charity bazaar or handicraft sale was the quintessential fund-raiser in that it widened the potential support base to the entire community and held out the promise of large profits. Bazaars were based on the basic mercantile principle that people are more likely to be parted from their money if they receive something in return. Many organizations held annual events, and preparations began months in advance. Indeed bazaars represented a substantial amount of work and planning-the goods for sale had to be produced, refreshments had to be made, the hall had to be decorated, invitations and announcements had to be distributed, and so on. Much of this preliminary work was done by members of the host association; these same members then had to work at the bazaar tables. On the whole, though, Montreal bazaars seem to have been much less elaborate than some of the fund-raising fairs in the United States, which featured elaborate costumes and stage sets as well as amusements.

  • What

    The charity bazaar pictured here seems quite modest; it may have been largely a sale of objects produced by hospital inmates rather than a large annual fund-raiser.

  • Where

    Charities often organised bazaars in large rented halls centrally located in the city. Hospitals, however, with larger facilities, tended to hold their bazaars in one of their own buildings.

  • When

    Bazaars were normally held in conjunction with the Christmas season to take advantage of holiday buying.

  • Who

    This bazaar was being held in support of the Protestant Hospital for the Insane in Verdun, but many charities used this method as their main fund-raiser.