VIEW-10763 | Shaar Hashomayim synagogue, 59 McGill College Avenue, Montreal, about 1910-11

 
Photograph
Shaar Hashomayim synagogue, 59 McGill College Avenue, Montreal, about 1910-11
Wm. Notman & Son
1910-1911, 20th century
Silver salts on glass - Gelatin dry plate process
25 x 20 cm
Purchase from Associated Screen News Ltd.
VIEW-10763
© McCord Museum
Description
Keywords:  Architecture (8646) , Photograph (77678) , religious (1331)
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Description

The word "synagogue" comes from Greek and refers to a congregation in a city or neighbourhood. In concrete terms, it means the place where the Jewish community gathers for prayers, celebrations and religious instruction. The Shaar Hashomayim community is one of Montreal's oldest Jewish congregations. It was founded in 1846 by English, German and Polish Jews who originally met in a rented space on St. James Street (today Rue Saint-Jacques). The Shaar Hashomayim synagogue has moved three times. The first synagogue was built in 1859 at 41 St. Constant Street, today Rue De Bullion, south of De La Gauchetière. In 1885, the synagogue at 59 McGill College Avenue was erected, and served the community until 1920. In the meantime, the congregation became open to all forms of Judaism. The growing community became rather constricted in its McGill College Avenue building, and had the current synagogue built in Westmount.