MP-0000.1762 | Old High School, University Street, Montreal, QC, 1870-80

 
The most recent version of the Flash plugin must be installed
Get Flash Player
Creative Commons License
Print
Old High School, University Street, Montreal, QC, 1870-80
Eugene Haberer
1870-1880, 19th century
Photolithography
10 x 22 cm
MP-0000.1762
© McCord Museum
Description
Keywords:  Architecture (8646) , educational (709) , Print (10661)
Select Image (Your image selection is empty)

Visitors' comments

Add a comment

Keys to History

In the 19th century, the teachers' mission was to teach young Canadians to read, write and count. They reigned over primary education, alongside the priests and nuns of the teaching religious congregations. However, lay teachers rarely taught in secondary schools, which were reserved for the affluent. In French Canada, classical colleges, directed by priests, were the only secondary educational institutions. In English Canada, grammar schools were gradually converted into high schools in the second half of the century. In 1870, the Protestant School Board of Montreal took over the administration of the Montreal High School for Boys, affiliated with McGill University. Five years later, the High School for Girls was set up. This would mark the beginning of public secondary education in Montreal. Lay teachers would be in the majority at the secondary level, which would undergo rapid development in the following century.

Source : Big Cities, New Horizons [Web tour], by Robert Gagnon, Université du Québec à Montréal (see Links)

  • What

    Print by Eugene Haberer representing the Montreal High School for Boys, the first public secondary school in Montreal.

  • Where

    Montreal High School was located on University Street in Montreal, facing the McGill University campus.

  • When

    This building originally housed the Grammar School, a private Anglophone educational institution, which would become Montreal High School in 1870.

  • Who

    In 1870, Montreal High School came under the jurisdiction of the Protestant School Board. It was also affiliated with McGill University.