M997.63.85 | Ti-Pierre-Jean-Jacques Shrinks After Brainwashing

 
The most recent version of the Flash plugin must be installed
Get Flash Player
Creative Commons License
Drawing, cartoon
Ti-Pierre-Jean-Jacques Shrinks After Brainwashing
Normand Hudon
1970, 20th century
18.8 x 21 cm
Gift of Mme Arlette Hudon
M997.63.85
© McCord Museum
Description
Keywords:  Bill 63 (4) , Cartoon (19139) , Crisis (453) , Drawing (18637) , drawing (18379) , figure (1849) , Finance (10) , French (13) , Jean-Jacques Bertrand (15) , Language (22) , Linguistic debate (92) , male (1608) , Montreal (409) , National assertion (94) , Political parties (800) , Political stakes (346) , politics (10928) , Politics (1624) , Premier (42) , Provincial (500) , Québec (427) , Québec or Canada political events (600) , Quiet Revolution (101) , St. James Street (13) , Union Nationale (90)
Select Image (Your image selection is empty)

Visitors' comments

Add a comment

Keys to History

The passing of Bill 63 revealed Québec Premier Jean-Jacques Bertrand's firm intention to stay on the right side of the business community, which at that time consisted primarily of English speakers who attached great importance to the issue of the language of instruction of their children.

  • What

    Bertrand's Union Nationale government sought to resolve the language debate that divided Québec by passing Bill 63. It recognized the right of parents, including immigrant parents, to choose the language of instruction of their children.

  • Where

    St. Jacques was one of Montreal's major streets and a large number of financial institutions had their offices there, many of them headed by English speakers.

  • When

    The Union Nationale government passed Bill 63 on November 20, 1969.

  • Who

    The leader of the Union Nationale, Jean-Jacques Bertrand, was premier of Québec from 1968 to 1970. The cartoonist refers to him here by the "affectionate' nickname of Ti-Pierre-Jean-Jacques.