M995.48.13.1-3 | Kerosene lamp (at left)

 
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Kerosene lamp (at left)
1885-1895, 19th century
44 cm
Gift of Dr. Huguette Rémy
M995.48.13.1-3
© McCord Museum
Description
Keywords:  Lamp (57)
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Keys to History

Following the discovery of kerosene in 1854, lamps burn using this inexpensive fuel. The simple kerosene lamp at left has an octagonal base embossed with fleurs-de-lis. French Canadians adopt this 12th-century emblem of the royal house of Bourbon as part of their own coat of arms. With the invention of the electric light bulb in 1879, brighter incandescent lighting competes with kerosene lamps. Old lamps are adapted to accommodate this new power source. The lamp at right has been converted to electricity. It has a fine chimney and lower blue bowl decorated with floral motifs. Oil lamps of the 1890s have circular glass chimney covers and oil holders, and have colourful scenes printed on them or are moulded into unusual shapes. They also have elaborately pierced metallic bases. At this time, there is competition from reliable gas lighting with the development of the incandescent gas mantle.

References
Michel Lessard, Objets anciens du Québec: La vie domestique (Montreal: Éditions de l'homme, 1994), p. 112, ill. 1 and 2.



Loris Shano Russell, A Heritage of Light (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1968), pp. 177-78, 200 and 314-15.

Source : Crowding the Parlour [Web tour], by Jane Cook, McGill University (see Links)

  • What

    On the left is a kerosene oil lamp with cotton wick. It has fleurs-de-lis on its glass base. At right is a kerosene lamp that has been converted into an elegant electric lamp.

  • Where

    The origin of these particular lighting devices is unknown. They were used in Quebec in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

  • When

    Kerosene lamps were in use by the 1860s. Some were converted to electricity starting in the early 1880s.

  • Who

    The makers and users of these lights are unknown.