M15934.54 | Victoria Bridge, progress of work from commencement in 1854 to completion in 1859

 
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Victoria Bridge, progress of work from commencement in 1854 to completion in 1859
John Duncan
1860 (published), 19th century
Ink on paper - Lithography
58.6 x 82 cm
Gift of Mr. David Ross McCord
M15934.54
© McCord Museum
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Keywords:  Architecture (8646) , bridge (558) , Print (10661)
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Keys to History

In 1854, the installation of the first floating coffer damn marked the beginning of work on the construction of the Victoria Bridge. On November 1 of that year, the first pier went up. By the end of December, when activities ceased for the winter, the second pier had already risen to a height of 1.20 metres above the surface of the river. The following year was quieter: operations slowed down due to the financial crisis that followed the Crimean War (1853-1856). Still, a number of
openwork coffers were completed. In 1856, operations went into full swing: many piers were completed and work on the caissons continued. On November 17, 1857, the first metal tube was installed. In 1858, the two central piers, numbers 12 and 13, were erected at the spot where the water was deepest and the current swiftest. The following year, the central tube, measuring 104 metres in length, would be laid on the piers. On August 16, 1859, the last pier was finally erected. That year also saw the installation of the permanent tracks on which the trains would run once the bridge was completed.