22243 | Carrig Leagh, the Jack Family residence, Portland, Saint John, New Brunswick, about 1861

 
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Drawing
Carrig Leagh, the Jack Family residence, Portland, Saint John, New Brunswick, about 1861
Alice Delacour Jack
About 1901, 20th century
Ink on paper
15.2 x 22.5 cm
Gift of E. Portia MacKenzie, 1962 (Emma Carleton Jack Memorial Collection)
22243
This artefact belongs to: © New Brunswick Museum
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Keys to History

A few years after their marriage in 1840, William Jack (1811-86) and Emma Carleton Kenah (1825-95) built a large home in Portland, then a suburb of Saint John, New Brunswick. They named their estate, Carrig Leagh, an Irish term that described the large grey stone cliffs bordering the property. Eleven children were born to the Jack family, and their shrieks of joy and occasional tears made for a very lively household. The property was the home of the Jack family for almost forty years, until its sale in 1880 to Sheriff Sturdee.

  • What

    Carrig Leagh was the site of many outdoor festivals for Sunday school children during the 1850s.

  • Where

    Isaac Allen Jack (1843-1903), Fanny's older brother, wrote a series of articles about life in Portland that were published in 1899 in The New Brunswick Magazine.

  • When

    Saint John architect Edwin Fairweather designed Carrig Leagh in 1844.

  • Who

    This drawing of Carrig Leagh was made by Alice Delacour Jack (1847-1921), Fanny Jack's (1854-1913) older sister.